Miami-Dade Added Nearly 19,000 Jobs in April as Unemployment Rate Dipped to 5 percent

Media Contact:

Maria Camacho

mcamacho@beaconcouncil.com

(305) 579-1341

(Miami) Miami-Dade added 18,700 new payroll jobs in the past year and unemployment decreased to 5 percent in April, from 5.4 percent the previous month, according to statistics released Friday.

“We’re encouraged as we continue to see year-over-year job growth across sectors,” said Jaap Donath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Research & Strategic Planning for the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “And we’re pleased to see the Miami metro area ranked No. 1 in startup activity in the U.S., according to Kauffman Foundation’s 2017 index. While we are pleased that our unemployment rate is descending, unemployment figures may not take into account our economic vitality as it relates to start-ups and the contractors and service providers that they employ.”

The numbers analyzed

Miami-Dade County created 18,700 new nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from April 2016 to April 2017 which was a 1.6 percent increase. Miami-Dade County continues to show year over year gains. Improvements in the non-farm payroll jobs can be found in a variety of sectors. Between March 2017 and April 2017, Miami-Dade County increased nonagricultural payroll jobs by 1,700 or 0.1 percentage point.

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami- Dade County was 5.0 in April 2017, which was a 0.4 percentage point decrease from March 2017 at 5.4 percent. This was the second time that the unemployment reached 5.0 percent since the recession. Compared to last year April there was also a 0.4 percentage point decrease with the unemployment rate at 5.4 percent.

In April 2017, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 5.2 percent, which was an 0.1 percentage point lower than April 2016.

From the data and analysis above, we see continued improvement in the local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-creation projects in targeted industries. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

* The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is unavailable at the time this report was composed.

More than 23,000 Miami-Dade Payroll Jobs added from March 2016 to 2017

(April 21, 2017 – Miami, FL) Miami-Dade experienced a healthy 2 percent job growth or 23,400 payroll jobs from March 2016 to March 2017 across industries with Education and Health Services (8,600) and Professional and Business Services (5,000) leading, according to state figures released Friday.

“We’re seeing consistent yearly job increases across industry sectors which is the priority of One Community One Goal, an initiative of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council to diversify the local economy and bring higher paying jobs,” said Jaap Donath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Research & Strategic Planning for the Miami-Dade Beacon Council.

The numbers analyzed

Miami-Dade County created 23,400 new nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from March 2016 to March 2017 which was a 2.0 percent increase. Miami-Dade County continues to show year over year gains. Improvements in the non-farm payroll jobs can be found in a variety of sectors. Between February 2017 and March 2017, Miami-Dade County increased nonagricultural payroll jobs by 2,600 or 0.2 percentage point.

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami- Dade County was 5.3 in March 2017, which was a 0.2 percentage point increase from February 2017 at 5.1 percent, and 0.2 percentage point decrease from March 2016 at 5.5 percent.

In March 2017, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 5.3 percent, which was an 0.1 percentage point lower than March 2016.

From the data and analysis above, we see continued improvement in the local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-creation projects in targeted industries. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

* The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is unavailable at the time this report was composed.

Miami-Dade Leads the State in Annual Job Growth in Education and Health Services

March 14, 2017

Miami-Dade County had the highest annual job growth in education and health services (8,100 jobs) compared to other metro areas in Florida from January 2016 to January 2017, according to statistics released March 10.

“Education and health services provide above-average paying wages,” said Jaap Donath, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Research & Strategic Planning for the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “We also gained more than 5,000 jobs in professional services which include jobs within our target industries like creative design, life sciences and tech. The One Community One Goal initiative continues to help grow high-paying jobs in Miami-Dade.”

The numbers analyzed

Miami-Dade County created 31,800 new nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from January 2016 to January 2017 which was a 2.8 percent increase. Miami-Dade County continues to show year over year gains. Improvements in the non-farm payroll jobs can be found in a variety of sectors. Between December 2016 and January 2017, Miami-Dade County decreased nonagricultural payroll jobs by 11,300 or 1.0 percentage point.

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami- Dade County was 5.1 in January 2017, which was a 0.2 percentage point decrease from January 2016 at 5.3 percent, and 0.3 percentage point decrease from December 2016 at 5.4 percent.

In January 2017, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 5.5 percent, which is the same as December 2016.

From the data and analysis above, we see continued improvement in the local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-creation projects in targeted industries. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

* The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is unavailable at the time this report was composed.

 

Gov. Scott Announces Cosentino to Relocate Americas Headquarters from Texas to Florida

March 15, 2017

Gov. Scott Announces Cosentino to Relocate Americas Headquarters from Texas to Florida

 

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – Today, Governor Rick Scott announced Cosentino, a global leader in natural stone, quartz, and recycled surfacing, is relocating its Americas Headquarters from Sugarland, Texas to Coral Gables. The relocation will create 85 new jobs and invest more than $1 million in the local community. Cosentino currently employs 60 Floridians across three distribution locations in Orlando, Fort Lauderdale and Lauderhill. The company also plans to open a design center in the Miami Design District.

Governor Scott said, “I am proud to announce that Cosentino will be relocating their Americas Headquarters from Texas to Florida and creating 85 new jobs for our families. This announcement would not be possible without the help of Enterprise Florida and shows the incredibly important role EFI has in out-competing other states like Texas to bring new job opportunities to our state. I am excited to welcome Cosentino to Florida and look forward to their future success.”

Cosentino Group, a family-owned company from Spain, is a worldwide producer and distributer of high-value innovative surfaces for architecture and design. The company currently employs more than 3,700 people worldwide, including 1,200 in the U.S. The new Americas Headquarters will house a management office with finance and sales personnel.

CEO Eduardo Cosentino said, “Miami’s location offers key strategic advantages to continue targeting the Americas. The entrepreneurial and innovative workforce in Miami better positions us to provide new products and designs that are both sustainable and advanced. Our partners at Enterprise Florida and the Miami-Dade Beacon Council helped make this move a reality, and we could not have found a better place to do business.”

This project was made possible through the close partnerships between Enterprise Florida, the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the City of Coral Gables, CareerSource Florida and local colleges and universities.

Mike Grissom, interim President and CEO of Enterprise Florida, Inc., said, “Cosentino is a great company and I am excited to see them bring their Americas headquarters to Miami as well as the 85 jobs that will now be right here in Florida. Our state is an amazing place to live, work and raise a family, and companies like Cosentino recognize this. I am happy to welcome them to Florida and look forward to their continued success.”

Cissy Proctor, Executive Director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, said, “I am proud that after growing its distribution business in Florida, Cosentino has recognized the value in moving its Americas Headquarters to the Sunshine State. Miami’s unmatched global resources and talented workforce are working to attract companies like Cosentino to our state every day.”

Jaret L. Davis, chair of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, said, “Cosentino is exactly the type of company whose business aligns with Miami-Dade’s focus on innovation. The family-owned company has stayed at the top of its game by developing innovative products that provide significant utility and sustainability without sacrificing design. We’re pleased to welcome them to Miami-Dade and excited about the impact of 85 additional high-wage jobs.”

Enterprise Florida, Inc. (EFI) is a partnership between Florida’s businesses and government leaders and is the principal economic development organization for Florida. EFI facilitates job growth through recruitment and retention, international trade and exporting, promotion of sporting events, and capital funding programs to assist small and minority businesses. EFI launched “Florida – The Future is Here” to promote the state as the nation’s premier business destination.

The Miami-Dade Beacon Council is the county’s official economic development partnership. The not-for-profit public-private organization focuses on job creation and economic growth. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,000 businesses that have created nearly 67,000 direct jobs and added more than $4.3 billion in new capital investments. It accomplishes this by marketing Miami-Dade as a world-class business location, growing local companies and shaping the local economy’s future. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com

About the Cosentino Group: The Cosentino Group is a global, family-owned company that produces and distributes high value innovative surfaces for architecture and design. As a leading company, Cosentino imagines and anticipates together with its customers and partners design solutions that offer value and inspiration to people’ lives. This goal is made possible by pioneering brands that are leaders in their respective segments such as Silestone®, Dekton® and Sensa by Cosentino®. Technologically advanced surfaces, which allow the creation of unique designs for the home and public spaces. The group bases its development on international expansion, an innovative research and development program, respect for the environment and sustainability, and its ongoing corporate commitment to society and the local communities where it operates, education, equality and health & safety. The Cosentino Group currently distributes its products and brands in more than 80 countries, from its headquarters in Almeria (Spain). Currently Cosentino is present in 32 countries, with its own assets in 29 of them. The group has seven factories (six in Almería, Spain, and one in Brazil), one intelligent logistic platform in Spain, and more than 120 commercial and business units throughout the world. More than 90% of Cosentino Group’s financial turnover comes from international markets.

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Source: Old Beacon Site

The Miami-Dade Beacon Council "Unlocks New Worlds of Business Opportunity"

March 7, 2017

 

During annual presentation of “Keys to the County” by Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez, 

Presented by TD Bank

 

(Miami, FL – March 7, 2017) – It’s a night to honor the growth of commerce and the entrepreneurial spirit of Miami-Dade County. The 2017 Key Ceremony is the event of the year that recognizes new or expanding companies assisted by the Miami-Dade Beacon Council.

This year, The Miami-Dade Beacon Council will honor 43 companies in our community on March 8 at the Hotel Intercontinental. The event presented by TD Bank includes an exhibit of the businesses during the Greenspoon Company Showcase.

The companies, representing a variety of target industries including aviation, technology, trade & logistics, entertainment, manufacturing and healthcare and illustrate Miami-Dade’s diverse base of industries and its strength as a global business hub. The companies will be honored with a Key to the County by Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez, County Commissioners, City Officials and other dignitaries also slated to participate.

“Tonight, we thank those businesses that fuel Miami-Dade County’s powerful economic engine,” Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez said. “There is no shortage of entrepreneurial talent in our community, and in partnership with the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, our goal is to provide businesses with the necessary environment and support to grow and bring even more jobs to our world-class community.”

“The Key Ceremony is our opportunity to salute the companies investing in Miami-Dade County,” Miami-Dade Beacon Council Chair Jaret L. Davis, Co-Managing Shareholder of Greenberg Traurig’s Miami office said. “We are pleased to have assisted 43 companies in the past year representing an array of industries including aviation, tech, creative design and trade & logistics. Together, they will create and retain more than 2,400 direct jobs and generate $162 million in new capital investment.”             

“TD Bank is proud once again to be the Presenting Sponsor of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council Key Ceremony. At TD we believe in strongly supporting the organizations and events that bring awareness to the needs of our local economy and bolster job growth.  The Key Ceremony is an impactful way to formally welcome companies that are new to Miami Dade County and recognize those who have recently expanded here.” said Pablo Pino, TD Bank Market President for Commercial – South Florida. 

Miami Herald Business Editor Jane Wooldridge is slated to emcee the event to be held:

    Wednesday, March 8
       Greenspoon Marder Company
Showcase/Reception begins at 6 p.m.
Program – 7 to 8 p.m.

        InterContinental Miami, 100 Chopin Plaza, Second Floor, Chopin Ballroom

       The following companies are scheduled to be honored:

Aims International Florida – a Brazilian executive talent management company located in Miami

– 5 new direct jobs

– $150,000 in new capital investment

Almod’s Diamonds Limited – manufacturing company that sells branded and generic diamonds and diamond jewelry located in Doral.

– 45 new direct jobs

– $2 million in new capital investments

Alpha Trade – imports products used in construction and represents companies exporting their products to U.S. markets located in Doral.

– 5 new direct jobs

– $110,000 in new capital investments

Ameriworld – provides back-office operations for local and foreign companies located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 22 new direct jobs

– $1 million in new capital investment

 

AVANTE USA – Spanish media agency that consults advertisers and advertising agencies, located in Coral Gables

– 5 new direct jobs

– $300,000 in new capital investments

Break the Cup – packages, roasts and trades coffee located in Miami Lakes.

12 new direct jobs

– $500,000 in new capital investment

 

Bunches to Go – provider of flower and gift delivery service in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 15 new direct jobs

– $200,000 in new capital investment

Captiva Containers – develops rigid packaging specializing in polymer-based packaging solutions, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 10 new direct jobs

– $1 million in new capital investment

CEEK VR – social virtual reality platform recently expanded, purchasing a building located in Liberty City thanks to new business opportunities with Universal Music and Google

– 70 new direct jobs

 

CEEPCO – design-build, minority-owned construction contractor and technical support consulting firm located in North Miami

– 35 new direct jobs

– $85,000 in new capital investments

ChicVacation – Travel agency startup specializing in custom tours for French and European visitors about Miami-Dade as investment platform located in Miami Beach

– 4 new direct jobs

– $60,000 in new capital investment

Clearsale – Brazilian tech company using ant-fraud solutions to prevent e-commerce scams located in Miami

– 26 new direct jobs

– $1.5 million in new capital investment 

Cosentino – Spanish producer and distributor of innovative surfaces for design and architecture relocated Americas headquarters from Texas to Coral Gables

– 85 new direct jobs

– $1.1 million in new capital investments

District 900 – a fashion incubator and County’s first shared workspace for the fashion industry located in Miami

– 30 new direct jobs

Dr. Smood – group of organic boutique cafes, located in Miami

– 60 new direct jobs

– $12 million in new capital investments

 

EMD Serono – Global biopharmaceutical company with a strong market position in neurology, endocrinology and reproductive health relocated Latin American headquarters from Brazil, located in Kendall

– 35 new direct jobs

– $1 million in new capital investments

 

Florida Minerals – imports and exports pet products and supplies, located in Miami Beach

– 7 new direct jobs

– $500,000 in new capital investment

 

Freebee – fleet of sponsor-themed 8-seat electric vehicles provides free transportation located in Miami

– 75 new direct jobs

– $1.6 million in new capital investments

 

Geoglobal USA – importer, distributor and supplier of home goods and furniture, located in Coral Gables

– 3 new direct jobs

– $20,000 in new capital investments

Hip Rock Star – integrated marketing firm that relocated from Atlanta, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 6 new direct jobs

– $25,000 in new capital investments

IMABE US – Spanish recycling company, in more than 50 countries, opened its newest plant in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 10 new direct jobs

– $500,000 in new capital investment

 

Ingapan USA – Spanish bakery expanded its operations to the U.S., located in Medley

– 35 new direct jobs

– $1.2 million in new capital investments

 

Innova Eco Building System – manufactures structural insulated panels considered to be construction materials of the future, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 15 new direct jobs

– $75,000 in new capital investment

 

Innovative Senior Management – provider of strategic planning and full suite of management services to assisted living industry, located in Miami Beach

– 150 new direct jobs

– $100,000 in new capital investments

 

Island Monkey Marketplace and Café – Caribbean fusion restaurant located in Perrine

– 7 new direct jobs

– $100,000 in new capital investments

 

KLX Aerospace Solutions – new global headquarters and distribution center for leading supplier of aerospace fasteners and consumables, located in Hialeah

– 581 jobs retained, 400 new direct jobs

– $48 million in new capital investment

 

Lamaignere USA – Spanish company specializes in air and sea cargo transportation, located in Doral

– 10 new direct jobs

– $600,000 in new capital investments

 

LH Trading – manages a diverse network of seaborne logistics operating bulk carrier vessels and specialized cement carriers, located in Coral Gables

– 8 new direct jobs

 

LoonyBum USA – German swimwear designer, manufacturer and distributor, located in Miami

– 20 new direct jobs

– $300,000 in new capital investments

 

OneBox – Spanish event ticketing company located in Coral Gables

– 10 new direct jobs

– $200,000 in new capital investments

 

Owatrol Coatings USA – French maker of quality wood-care products and decorative paints, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 3 new direct jobs

– $25,000 in new capital investments

 

Petit Pois – women’s fashion designer Viviana Gabeiras is expanding her lifestyle brand “Petit Pois by Viviana G”, located in Hialeah

– 12 new direct jobs

– $150,000 in new capital investments

 

Schenker Americas – German-based transportation and logistics services provider, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 75 new direct jobs

– $760,000 in new capital investments

 

Sherpa Water – imports and markets water fortified from nutrients found in the Himalayas, located in Miami

– 15 new direct jobs

– $1.8 million in new capital investment

 

Spineway – French medical device company located in Aventura specializing in research and creation of new implants and instruments for spinal surgery

– 10 new direct jobs

– $500,000 in new capital investment

Stephanie Creates – multifaceted production and promotions company focused on communities and cultures, located in Miami

– 14 new direct jobs

– $30,000 in new capital investment

 

Synchroteam – French logistics company located in Miami Beach operates mobile management logistics, tracking and ordering solutions

– 4 new direct jobs

– $300,000 in new capital investment

 

Tecnocom USA -Spanish tech company establishes U.S. headquarters for banking systems and automated networks, located in Coral Gables

– 50 new direct jobs

– $2 million in new capital investments

 

Telefonica USA – Spain’s primary telecommunications company is increasing the size of its Miami hub, located in Doral

– 20 new direct jobs

– $9 million in new capital investment

 

United Parcel Service – package-delivery company chooses Miami over Jacksonville, Nashville and Louisville for its new vehicle packaging hub retaining hundreds of jobs, located in unincorporated Miami-Dade

– 25 new direct jobs

– $65 million in new capital investments

 

Vectornate – creates, markets and distributes water filtrations systems and products, located in Medley

– 20 new direct jobs

– $150,000 in new capital investments

 

Weblogs – Spanish tech company that specializes in designing corporate blogs, located in Miami

– 8 new direct jobs

– $400,000 in new capital investments

 

Woosh Water – Patented smart water stations provide drinking water “on the go” located in Miami

– 11 new direct jobs

– $8 million in new capital investment

 

Thank you to our event sponsors: TD Bank, Greenspoon Marder, 2020 Ponce, Becker & Poliakoff, BDO, CITIGROUP Center, Colonnade Plaza, Dosal Tobacco Corporation, EWM Realty International, FIU Business, InterContinental Miami, Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Ocean Bank, and Roar Media.

 

Thank you to our sustaining investors: Miami Herald, American Airlines and MBF Healthcare Partners.

 

The Miami-Dade Beacon Council  is the county’s official economic development partnership. The not-for-profit public-private organization focuses on job creation and economic growth. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,000 businesses that have created nearly 67,000 direct jobs and added more than $4.3 billion in new capital investments. It accomplishes this by marketing Miami-Dade as a world-class business location, growing local companies and shaping the local economy’s future. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com

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Source: Old Beacon Site

Miami: A new haven for young professionals

 

Beacon Council outlines plans for local job development

BY NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

nnehamas@miamiherald.com

 

Miami-Dade County must keep diversifying its economy in order to protect against another recession, local community leaders said at an annual Beacon Council meeting on Wednesday.

The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade’s economic development agency, announced plans to launch an online career portal for job-seekers and employers in seven key industries at the heart of its One Community One Goal initiative, which was launched in 2012 to create local jobs with good salaries.

“We have the talent here in Miami-Dade County,” said Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez, who spoke at the event. “We don’t want to lose that talent to anywhere else.”

The target industries include aviation; banking and finance; creative design; information technology; hospitality and tourism; life sciences and healthcare; and trade and logistics.

Those fields are important because they offer plenty of so-called “middle-skill” jobs that pay a living wage, according to a report presented by JPMorgan Chase.

Middle-skill jobs require additional training beyond high school but do not require a bachelor’s degree. About 22 percent of Miami’s 1.2 million jobs are middle-skill roles that pay a median hourly wage of nearly $25, JPMorgan found based on data from 2014. The region’s median wage is $18.48 per hour, according to the study.

Still, local employers are struggling to find workers for those positions because lower-income residents don’t have access to the training they need, said Chauncy Lennon, managing director of global philanthropy at the investment bank.

The seven target fields are expected to create about 9,540 middle-skill job openings per year through 2019.

To connect would-be workers with such jobs, the bank recommended that the Beacon Council and its community partners invest in training for low-skilled youth and adults interested in the two fastest growing fields — trade and information technology— and advertise about the availability of positions.

Larry Williams, president and CEO of the Beacon Council, a public-private partnership funded partly with tax dollars, said the JPMorgan report would guide the council’s planning on job creation in the future.

This year’s co-chairs for One Community One Goal are Matt Haggman, Miami program director for the Knight Foundation, and Nelson Lazo, CEO of Doctors Hospital Baptist Health South Florida.

About 500 people who attended the event, held at Jungle Island, also learned about progress in the initiative’s various goals, including a paid internship program for local students announced in April.

The Talent Development Network so far has 45 postings from Baptist Health South Florida, American Airlines and Miami-Dade County, said Steven Rojas Tallon, program lead for the network. The network plans to create about 200 paid internships in the next 20 months, he said.

Alexander Iglesias, a rising junior at Florida International University, started an internship with Baptist through the network earlier this month. “It’s a great opportunity to get real-world work experience,” Iglesias said.

FIU president Mark Rosenberg urged business leaders in the audience to register for the network.

“It is a shared responsibility for us to generate the talent for this community but we cannot do it without you,” Rosenberg said.

Progress on other initiatives has been slower.

An incubator for talented local fashion designers was formulated three years ago and officially launched last year at the downtown Macy’s store but still needs about $150,000 in funding. It is looking to local companies for help and has secured space at the Macy’s stores that will open at the new Miami Worldcenter mall in the fall of 2017.

 

New programs include a similar incubator for trade and logistics and an urban initiatives committee that will help grow businesses in lower-income areas.

“We’re really going to be looking at how we grow the innovation system, the entrepreneurs, so we can grow that next generation of ingenuity here in Miami-Dade,” Williams said.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/article28354264.html#storylink=cpy

Op-ed: Skills Gap Highlights Challenges, Opportunities for Miami

Workforce initiatives focus on creating and filling middle-skills jobs.

When the global economy sputtered and seized in the recession of 2008-2010, Florida’s Miami-Dade County region was hit hard. Today, the economy has vastly improved with the unemployment rate close to pre-recession levels. It’s a good time to evaluate and address our needs for more skilled workers in high-growth industries. A rebounding economy can offer communitywide prosperity with the right focus on skills development.

According to the newly released JPMorgan Chase report, Trading on Innovation to Expand Opportunity, 9,500 new middle-skills jobs – those that need more than a high school diploma, but not necessarily a four-year degree – are projected to be created every year through 2019. Miami-Dade is ready to fill these jobs with skilled workers.

Many of these positions will be created in two of the highest-growth industries in the community: trade and logistics, and information technology. More importantly, these jobs are economic and lifestyle superchargers. They pay well, giving individuals and families more disposable income and a better quality of life and thus contributing to the economic growth of Miami-Dade County.

That’s why JPMorgan Chase & Co. launched its New Skills at Work initiative to rebuild and retool the workforce in nine cities around the nation, including Miami. JPMorgan Chase committed $5 million to help close the workforce skills gap in Miami-Dade County. At a recent event held by The Beacon Council, the county’s economic development partner, to promote its One Community One Goal job-growth expansion initiative, JPMorgan Chase released a report that examines where these jobs are and offers a framework for how to fill them.

Miami-Dade County educators, community groups and governments have the opportunity to work with the business community to know where the opportunities are and to develop programs that will close this skills gap and create meaningful careers paths that help more people achieve prosperity.

Some important steps are already being taken. Through One Community One Goal, “Orientation to Career” camps have been created to formally introduce high school students to high-growth industries with visits to venues such as the Port of Miami and Miami International Airport. Career awareness websites are also being established to provide detailed information about available jobs and skills required. The Talent Development Network provides an online tool that matches qualified students with paid internships at local businesses.

Today, Miami is one of the first communities with an Academic Leaders Council; all six local college and university presidents and the superintendent of Miami-Dade County Public Schools meet regularly with industry committees to align curriculum with job skills needed. In the trade and logistics industry, for example, new courses were created for supply chain management, a skill in high demand. This creates a new narrative for Miami-Dade County where historic data underscored a serious problem in job readiness; the region’s education and training system has responded and is preparing enough people to obtain these jobs.

The good news is that most of those 9,500 new jobs created each year, according to the JPMorgan Chase report, will start with pay that is above the region’s living wage ($20.41 an hour for families with two adults and one child) and substantially above the state’s minimum wage of $7.93. But more than a boost in pay, middle-skills jobs provide people with a career path that has opportunities for continued professional development, with continued earnings and benefits growth.

Consider the example of a person who gets the training needed to fill an entry level middle-skills position in IT (systems analyst, Web developer or computer support). That person would see starting compensation of more than $22 an hour – already above the region’s living wage and almost triple the minimum wage. But that is just the entry level to a career path that can reach more than $37 an hour – nearly $80,000 a year in salary plus benefits.

In trade and logistics, middle-wage jobs can pay even more. The average median wage for a person with the skills to fill an entry level in supply chain, warehouse and distribution is nearly $24 an hour, opening the door to more senior positions that pay up to almost $55 an hour – or $115,000 in gross pay.

Miami-Dade has the right academic system to get people the necessary skills for those opportunities. This effort requires a committed, collaborative effort between government, business, educators and nonprofit organizations. The research proves both the need and opportunity exist. Now we must continue to grow our collective efforts. With this, Miami-Dade will have not just greater economic growth but stronger, healthier communities as well.

Chauncy Lennon is head of workforce initiatives for JPMorgan Chase.
Larry K. Williams is president and CEO of The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade’s economic development organization.