SoftBank Joins Ambitious Initiative to Build a More Equitable Pipeline for Data Science Talent

 

SoftBank partners with Correlation One’s pioneering effort to upskill up to 10,000 workers from underrepresented communities across the U.S. and Latin America

 

Miami, Florida – FEBRUARY 18, 2021 – SoftBank Group International (SoftBank) as part of its AI Academy, today announced its support for Data Science for All / Empowerment (DS4A / Empowerment), a new effort designed to upskill and prepare job seekers from underserved communities for data science careers. Developed by Correlation One, DS4A / Empowerment aims to train at least 10,000 people from underrepresented communities over the next three years, providing new pathways to economic opportunity in the world’s fastest-growing industries.

“We need talent with a deep understanding of data science to build the companies of the future,” said Marcelo Claure, CEO of SoftBank Group International. “We’re proud to support this effort, continue to upskill our portfolio companies and train more than 10,000 people from underrepresented communities with critical technical skills.”

SoftBank’s AI Academy supports programs that supplement theoretical training of traditional technical education courses with practical lessons, including AI and data skills that can be immediately applied to common business needs.

DS4A / Empowerment will provide training for SoftBank Group International portfolio company employees, including portfolio companies of the Opportunity Fund and Latin America Fund, as well as external candidates from the U.S. and Latin America. The program is specifically designed to address talent and equity gaps in a field that has historically been inaccessible for many workers, leading to significant underrepresentation of women and non-white individuals. Participants work on real-world case studies that are expected to have measurable impact on the operational performance of participating companies.

IDB Lab will join SoftBank by providing over ten full-ride Fellowships to underrepresented candidates in Latin America while the Miami-Dade Beacon Council will provide four full-ride fellowships for underrepresented candidates based in Miami.

In addition, The City of Miami will join as an impact partner by providing twenty fellowships to Miami talent and five fellowships to public sector workers.

“As Miami grows as a tech hub, it is important that we empower local entrepreneurs and the public sector to leverage the power of AI. We are proud to support the building of a diverse data-fluent community in Miami through our partnership with Correlation One and SoftBank,” said Francis Suarez, Mayor of the City of Miami.

Participants in the program will receive 13 weeks of data and analytics training (plus optional Python training) while working on case studies and projects, including projects submitted by SoftBank portfolio companies. The initiative will also connect participants with mentors who will provide professional development and career coaching. At the end of the program, external participants will be connected with employment opportunities at SoftBank and leading enterprises across business, financial services, technology, healthcare, consulting, and consumer sectors.

“Miami’s success hinges on dramatically expanding opportunity across our community and building a workforce with the skills for the jobs of tomorrow,” said Matt Haggman, Executive Vice President of One Community One Goal at the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “This program is an important step towards creating the innovative and equitable future we can – and must – achieve.”

“Training our residents to take on the jobs of the future is critical to ensuring that economic growth is shared across all communities, and to building our local talent so that more leading companies in fields like tech and data science can put down roots in Miami-Dade,” said Daniella Levine-Cava, Miami-Dade County’s Mayor. “I’m thrilled that this program is unlocking opportunities in a field that has historically been inaccessible for so many, and creating new, inclusive pathways to prosperity in one of the world’s fastest-growing industries.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic has both accelerated demand for data science talent and exacerbated the access gaps that kept so many aspiring workers locked out of opportunity,” said Rasheed Sabar and Sham Mustafa, Co-CEOs and Co-Founders of Correlation One. “We are grateful to work with innovative employers like SoftBank that are stepping up to play a more direct role in helping the workforce prepare themselves for jobs of the future.”

 

Program and Registration Details

DS4A Empowerment is an online program delivered in English over a 13-week period. Classes will convene on Saturdays from 10:00am to 8:00pm ET, beginning on April 17, 2021.

Registration for the program ends on March 7, 2021. Candidates who should consider applying include employees of SoftBank affiliated portfolio companies in the region as well as software engineers, technical product managers, technical marketers, and anyone with a STEM background who is interested in learning data analysis. To apply and find out more information about the program, interested candidates can visit the official DS4A Empowerment website: https://c1-web.correlation-one.com/ds4a-empowerment

For program related inquiries, please contact ds4aempowerment@correlation-one.com.

 

About SoftBank

The SoftBank Group invests in breakthrough technology to improve the quality of life for people around the world. The SoftBank Group is comprised of SoftBank Group Corp. (TOKYO: 9984), an investment holding company that includes telecommunications, internet services, AI, smart robotics, IoT and clean energy technology providers; the SoftBank Vision Funds, which are investing up to $100 billion to help extraordinary entrepreneurs transform industries and shape new ones; and the SoftBank Latin America Fund, the largest venture fund in the region. To learn more, please visit https://global.softbank

About Correlation One

Correlation One is on a mission to build the most equitable vocational school of the future. We believe that data literacy is the most important skill for the future of work. We make data fluency a competitive edge for firms through global data science competitions, rigorous data skills assessments, and enterprise-focused data science training.

Correlation One’s solutions are used by some of the most elite employers all around the world in finance, technology, healthcare, insurance, consulting and governmental agencies. Since launching in 2015, Correlation One has built an expert community of 250,000+ data scientists and 600+ partnerships with leading universities and data science organizations in the US, UK, Canada, China, and Latin America.

https://www.correlation-one.com/about

 

 

Media Contacts

For SoftBank:

Laura Gaviria Halaby

Laura.gaviria@softbank.com

 

For City of Miami:

Stephanie Severino

sseverino@miamigov.com

 

For Miami-Dade Beacon Council:

Maria Budet
mbudet@beaconcouncil.com

 

For Miami-Dade County Mayor’s Office:

Rachel Johnson

rachel.johnson2@miamidade.gov

From November 2020 to December 2020, there was an increase of 4,600 nonagricultural payroll jobs; a 0.4 percentage point increase

Sponsored by:

The numbers analyzed

In December 2020, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 7.3 percent. The County had a reduction of 69,200 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from December 2019 to December 2020 which was a 5.6 percentage point decrease. From November 2020 to December 2020, there was an increase of 4,600 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 0.4 percentage point increase.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (December 2019 with December 2020). The sectors most affected are Leisure & Hospitality (-24,100), Total Government (-15,200), Education & Health Services (-10,600), Retail Trade (-6,200), Other Services (-4,100), Professional & Business Services (-3,900), Wholesale Trade (-3,600), and Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities (-3,500). The sectors seeing some improvements in the past 12 months are Financial Activities (+1,500), Construction (+1,100), and Manufacturing (+300). The graph below shows the payroll data since November 2018.

 

From December 2019 to December 2020 there was a reduction of 69,200 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From November 2020 to December 2020 there was an increase of 4,600 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

 

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between November 2020 and December 2020 shows that several sectors have added jobs, including in sectors that were the hardest hit during the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. These sectors include Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities (+2,300), Retail Trade (+1,600), Leisure and Hospitality (+1,400), and Wholesale Trade (+400).

 

SectorDecember 2019- December 2020November 2020 – December 2020
Financial Activities+1,500 (+1.8%)+1,300 (+1.6%)
Construction+1,100 (+2.1%)-900 (-1.6%)
Manufacturing +300 (+0.7%)-1,600 (-3.6%)
Information-900 (-4.3%)00 (0.0%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-3,500 (-4.0%)+2,300 (+2.8%)
Wholesale Trade-3,600 (-4.9%)+400 (+0.6%)
Professional & Business Services-3,900 (-2.1%)+2,700 (+1.5%)
Other Services-4,100 (-8.1%)+400 (+0.9%)
Retail Trade-6,200 (-4.1%)+1,600 (+1.1%)
Education & Health Services-10,600 (-5.4%)-800 (-0.4%)
Total Government-15,200 (-10.4%)-2,200 (-1.6%)
Leisure and Hospitality-24,100 (-16.3%)+1,400 (+1.1%)

 

 

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.3 percent in December 2020 compared to last year is 5.7 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 1.6 percent in December 2019. Compared to November 2020 there was a 0.6 percentage point decrease from the unemployment rate at 7.9 percent.

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since December 2018.

 

 

 

 

December 2020
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
December 2019 to

December 2020
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County7.3%+5.7%
Broward County6.6%+4.0%
Palm Beach County5.5%+2.8%
Florida5.8%+3.3%
United States6.5%+3.1%

 

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate 

In December 2020, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 7.5 percent, which is 5.5 percentage points higher than in December 2019. The unemployment rate is 0.6 percentage points lower than in November 2020 when it was at 8.1 percent.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

 

Building Together: Miami-Dade Tech Leaders Present Shared Vision For Dynamic, Diverse, Inclusive Ecosystem In #Miamitech Manifesto

—Celebrates Miami’s unique strengths and invites makers, technologists, and advocates
to collaborate and drive equitable, inclusive growth for the 305—

MIAMI, FL – JANUARY 7, 2021 – A collective of tech leaders, builders, and advocates that have contributed to the foundation of Miami-Dade’s dynamic, growing tech and innovation ecosystem collaborated on a #MiamiTech Manifesto released earlier this week. Working together for more than a decade to actively lay the groundwork for an equitable, inclusive community, the increased interest in and conversations about the business opportunities Miami presents led some of these leaders to put pen to paper and outline that shared vision – for themselves and all of the newcomers that we are happily welcoming.

 

“We can’t talk about Miami tech without talking about diversity, equity, and inclusion, and the release of the Miami Tech Manifesto marks an important step forward in this growing movement,” stated Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava.  We need a shared set of principles for how we continue to build a tech ecosystem that is inclusive and unifying. I look forward to working hand-in-hand with our diverse coalition of leaders, advocates, and innovators to ensure that efforts to expand our tech economy drive us toward the goals of shared economic growth and building a more equitable community.” 

WeAreMiamiTech.com features the 11-point Manifesto, which is “of, by, and for, the people behind the #miamitech movement… We’re taking advantage of this unique moment to articulate the values, opportunities, and principles that guide our vision – both for ourselves and for those who wish to join us.” Conceptualized by Christine Johnson (The Beacon Council), Maria Derchi Russo (Refresh Miami), Brian Breslin (Refresh Miami and The Launchpad), Leigh-Ann Buchanan (Venture Café Miami), Michelle Abbs (Mana Tech) and Rebekah Monson (WhereBy.Us), the MiamiTech Manifesto team also includes Ana Paula Gonzalez (500 Startups), Melissa Medina (eMerge America), Aileen Alon and Maharlika (Venture Café Miami), Gregory Johnson (Code for South Florida), Maxeme Tuchman (Caribu), Rebecca Danta (Miami Angels), Carlos Vazquez (Miami EdTech), Ja’Dan Johnson (Center for Black Innovation), and Claudia Duran (Endeavor Miami). The Manifesto invites supporters to join the movement and pledge their commitment to these values and vision for Miami’s tech community; more than 138 pledges were captured on the first day.

 

“This is a unique window of opportunity and point of growth for Miami’s tech and innovation community, and for that of South Florida as a whole. It’s great to see our ecosystem attracting the attention it deserves,” said Christine Johnson, Vice President of Innovation at the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “The people and organizations driving a lot of this work – and the shared vision for what we were building – had not previously been documented in a formal way. At this inflection point, we felt it

 

was critical for a representative group of Miami’s tech leaders to collaboratively craft a public statement. The Manifesto not only serves as an invitation to newcomers to build forward with us, but it provides common language that champions our unique value proposition as a global business community that is women-led and powered by immigrants and majority-minority businesses.”

 

To ensure that dialogue and community-building are truly inclusive, tech and community leaders are extending the conversation through events like “The Case for Equity & Inclusion in Miami’s Tech Ecosystem”, a virtual town hall presented from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM this Thursday, January 7, 2021. Hosted by Venture Café Miami, this conversation features thought leaders, builders and key stakeholders in Miami’s tech ecosystem including Felecia Hatcher-Pearson, Co-Founder, Center for Black Innovation; Michelle Abbs, Managing Director, Mana Tech; Maria Derchi Russo, Refresh Miami; Keith Carswell, Senior Advisor to City of Miami’s City Manager; Dr. Lashinda S. Moore, Principal, iTech; Leigh-Ann Buchanan, President & Executive Director, Venture Café Miami; and special guests Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava and City of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez.

 

“We want to build a culture of innovation and opportunity for every man, woman, and child in Miami,” says City of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez. “We have to ensure nobody gets left behind.”

 

“As a younger ecosystem, we’ve had the benefit of being able to learn lessons both from what works and what hasn’t worked in other tech communities. It was important for us to capture these values and share a working vision with our local counterparts as well as our new arrivals and folks considering moving to Miami. We want them to know what we stand for and what we strive for,” says Michelle
Abbs, Managing Director at Mana Tech. “As a long-time champion for Miami’s tech community and builder myself, I knew I had to do something in this unique moment. I have personally experienced the downfall of a toxic tech culture, and I have also known what it means to be valued and included in the tech space. I feel protective of the accessible and collaborative community we’ve built because, while we have work to do, it is indeed a rare exception to see as many women and people of color in leadership positions. We must expand on the momentum into a place of action that is inclusive, equitable and true to the kind of community we have been working to build. That is why I think Thursday’s Town Hall with Venture Café is an important next step. ”

To join MiamiTech’s makers, technologists and advocates in building an equitable, inclusive, collaborative, and thriving community, visit: https://wearemiamitech.com/

To register for Thursday’s virtual Town Hall, “The Case for Equity & Inclusion in Miami’s Tech Ecosystem” from 6:00PM – 8:00PM on January 7th: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AnJ55E94QzKLgBorjfbuVg

 

###

 

 

 


About the #MiamiTech Manifesto
Miami is a haven for innovators, builders and those who wield technology as a powerful tool of social change. A collective of local tech builders and leaders that have intentionally laid the groundwork toward a shared vision of an inclusive community for makers, technologists and advocates in the 305. The #MiamiTech Manifesto is of, by and for the people behind Miami’s tech movement – those that have been here for years, and the recent arrivals that are helping us build even more momentum. A living statement of purpose and accountability, it represents our commitment to who we are as an ecosystem and where we strive to be. It is a declaration of the principles we aim to uphold and the values we endeavor to embody. As we evolve, so will the manifesto because we are building together. Fore more information, visit: https://wearemiamitech.com/

About the Miami‐Dade Beacon Council
The MiamiDade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,200 businesses to expand in or relocate to Miami-Dade, creating more than 104,000 direct and indirect jobs combined, and driving more than $6.7 billion in new capital investments. A professional staff and volunteer community leaders work together to promote Miami-Dade as a world‐class business community at the forefront of a changing global economy, driving long-term growth and prosperity for the region. For more information, visit: www.beaconcouncil.com.

For press Inquiries regarding Mana Tech, please contact Marcia Martinez Laas, Power Collective (marcia@powercollective.com).

 

From October 2020 to November 2020, there was an increase of 15,300 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 1.3 percentage point increase

Sponsored by:

The numbers analyzed

In November 2020, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 7.4 percent. The County had a reduction of 68.000 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from November 2019 to November 2020 which was a 5.5 percentage point decrease. From October 2020 to November 2020, there was an increase of 15,300 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 1.3 percentage point increase.

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (November 2019 with November 2020). The sectors most affected are Leisure & Hospitality (-24,600), Total Government (-14,300), Education & Health Services (-10,900), Retail Trade (-7,600), Professional & Business Services (-4,900), Other Services (-3,700) and Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities (-3,400). The sectors seeing some improvements in the past 12 months are Manufacturing (+2,600), Construction (+1,300), and Financial Activities (+200). The graph below shows the payroll data since October 2018.

From November 2019 to November 2020 there was a reduction of 68,000 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From October 2020 to November 2020 there was an increase of 15,300 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between October 2020 and November 2020 shows that several sectors have added jobs, including in sectors that were the hardest hit during the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. These sectors include Leisure and Hospitality (+3,400), Retail (+2,300), Education and Health Services (+1,800) Manufacturing (+1,200), and Wholesale Trade (+1,000).

SectorNovember 2019- November 2020October 2020 – November 2020
Manufacturing +2,600 (+6.3%)+1,400 (+3.3%)
Construction+1,300 (+2.4%)+200 (+0.4%)
Financial Activities+200 (+0.2%)+300 (+0.4%)
Information-600 (-2.9%)+100 (+0.5%)
Wholesale Trade-2,100 (-2.9%)+1,00 (+0.1%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-3,400 (-3.9%)+2,800 (+3.5%)
Other Services-3,700 (-7.5%)+500 (-1.1%)
Professional & Business Services-4,900 (-2.7%)+1,400 (+0.8%)
Retail Trade-7,600 (-5.1%)+4,200 (+3.0%)
Education & Health Services-10,900 (-5.6%)+1,800 (+1.0%)
Total Government-14,300 (-9.7%)-500 (-0.4%)
Leisure and Hospitality-24,600 (-16.7%)+3,000 (+2.5%)

 

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.4 percent in November 2020 compared to last year is 5.7 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 1.7 percent in November 2019. Compared to October 2020 there was a 1.3 percentage point decrease from the unemployment rate at 8.7 percent.

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since October 2018.

 

 

November 2020
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
November 2019 to

November 2020
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County7.4%+5.7%
Broward County7.3%+4.7%
Palm Beach County6.1%+3.2%
Florida6.3%+3.6%
United States6.4%+3.1%

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

 

In November 2020, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 7.6 percent, which is 5.6 percentage points higher than in November 2019. The unemployment rate is 1.2 percentage points lower than in October 2020 when it was at 8.8 percent. 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

Miami Community Ventures, A One Community One Goal Initiative, Celebrates Its Inaugural year with 150+ Job Placements

—Entrepreneurship track set to launch in 2021 as an alternative pathway and a source of new jobs—

MIAMI, FL – DECEMBER 16, 2020 – The Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the County’s official public-private economic development partnership, is pleased to celebrate Miami Community Ventures’ (MCV) first full  year, with more than 150 job placements throughout Miami-Dade County. Launched in 2019, this One Community One Goal collective impact program was designed to connect low-income structurally unemployed individuals to living wage jobs and long-term career pathways. A combined 50+ partners, supporters and funders have contributed to MCV’s successful rollout, raising more than $1.8 Million to-date – including a recent $400,000 grant from JPMorgan Chase.

“Miami Community Ventures is about breaking down the barriers to success and creating long-term economic mobility for some of the most at-risk and vulnerable citizens in our shared community,” stated Maria Escorcia, Vice President of Corporate Responsibility for JPMorgan Chase. “At JPMorgan Chase, we are committed to giving those that need it a helping hand – and in many cases a second chance. We are pleased to see the inroads that The Beacon Council is making through our grant dollars to reduce unemployment and poverty in Miami.”

Miami Community Ventures (MCV) is designed to empower structurally unemployed individuals to succeed, providing wraparound support services to program participants for up to one year after being hired, allowing them to focus on retention, development, and success. This year’s immediate objective was to achieve targeted number of job placements with living wage jobs and a 1-year+ job retention rate of 65%.

“2020 has been a challenging year for everyone, and our main objective for MCV was to kick the program off successfully and meet our job placement target,” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “This workforce program has been proven to have a positive impact on the broader community – not just the participants and their families. The support of local businesses able to provide job placement opportunities is essential to the continued success of this program, and we encourage companies to connect with our team and learn more about how to participate.”

Support from community partners, employers, and funders including Miami-Dade County, CareerSource South Florida and others listed below, helped keep MCV on track despite the pandemic. More than 150 job placements were secured at an average hourly wage of $16.12, which is 18% above the wage target. Ex-offenders account for 41% of the placements, with program participants living in Miami’s most underserved communities with poverty rates of 20% or higher.

For Miami-Dade County, the rate of unemployment and poverty in underserved communities exceeds national, state, and comparable county-wide averages. Unemployment impacts poverty, recidivism, and crime rates. Designed to deliver long-term inclusive economic benefits to local communities over a state-audited five-year period, Miami Community Ventures addresses core unemployment issues and delivers solutions that positively impact individuals, families, employers, and communities for generations to come.

“It’s unrealistic to think that all it takes for someone to succeed is getting the job,” said Miami-Dade County Commissioner Eileen Higgins, representative of District 5 and an early champion for MCV. “That’s just the first step and, as many workers in our community know, plenty of challenges can stand in the way of a low-income resident who wants to work from being able to keep a job. What is exciting about the Miami Community Ventures approach is the ‘whatever it takes’ mentality to help folks get and stay in living wage jobs.”

For 2021, the target for job placements is increasing to 280 as the program already has employer partner commitments from Advanced Roofing, Bean Auto Group, Ussery Automotive Group, with additional partners continuing to sign on.

“FIU’s Construction Trades Program’s involvement with Miami Community Venture has proven to be significantly beneficial to our students and the program,” stated Victoria E. Tomas, Senior Program Coordinator, Moss Department of Construction at Florida International University. “Our partnership provides the students possibilities, options and access to be successful in their new career path in construction.”

A new program feature scheduled to launch in Q1 2021 is MCV’s Entrepreneurship Track. With support from founding sponsor Bank of America, the entrepreneurship track targets small community businesses that can scale with the right support. This track will offer toolkits to help female-owned Black and LatinX early-stage businesses grow, including hands-on coaching, mentorship, and premium access to procurement and funding opportunities. The success of these businesses will stimulate job creation and drive positive economic impact where it is most needed. Consistently among the top cities for start-ups – and, specifically, for women entrepreneurs – Miami is an ideal market for an entrepreneurial extension of MCV.

Led by Sheri Colas Gervais, Vice President and Executive Director of Miami Community Ventures, the program’s strategic advisory group includes George Acevedo, Divisional Director/Managing Director, JPMorgan Chase Bank; Eduardo Padron, PhD, President Emeritus, Miami Dade College; and Penny Shaffer, PhD, Market President – South Florida, Florida Blue; with support from Matt Haggman, Executive Vice President, One Community One Goal, and Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, The Beacon Council.

Miami Community Ventures is grateful to all of the funders that have made the program successful to-date: Allegany Franciscan Ministries; Bank of America; Bank United; Baptist Health South Florida; CareerSource South Florida; Florida Blue; JPMorgan Chase; Miami-Dade County; OIC South Florida; Truist Foundation; and Uber. To explore opportunities to support Miami Community Ventures as a funder, employer, and/or community partner, please contact Sheri Colas Gervais, Vice President & Executive Director, Miami Community Ventures at scolas@beaconcouncil.com.

For a complete list of community partners and additional information about the Miami Community Ventures program, please see attachment or visit: https://www.beaconcouncilfoundation.org/mcv.

For more information about The Beacon Council Foundation visit: www.beaconcouncilfoundation.org.

 

About the Miami‐Dade Beacon Council
The MiamiDade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,200 businesses to expand in or relocate to Miami-Dade, creating more than 104,000 direct and indirect jobs combined, and driving more than $6.7 billion in new capital investments. A professional staff and volunteer community leaders work together to promote Miami-Dade as a world‐class business community at the forefront of a changing global economy, driving long-term growth and prosperity for the region. For more information, visit: www.beaconcouncil.com.


About One Community One Goal

One Community One Goal (OCOG) is a roadmap for Miami-Dade County’s future economic development success.  This initiative provides a collaborative platform that promotes community-wide economic development and prosperity in Miami-Dade County, by driving innovation, leveraging strengths, providing clear thought leadership, and coalescing public and private priorities. One Community One Goal brings together a broad spectrum of Miami-Dade organizations, working to advance the goal of a thriving, inclusive and diverse community. For more information on OCOG, visit: www.beaconcouncilfoundation.org/ocog.


A
bout The Beacon Council Foundation

The Beacon Council Economic Development Foundation, Inc. is a Florida Not for Profit Corporation created exclusively for charitable and educational purposes:

  • To compile, prepare, and publish statistical data concerning Miami‐Dade County Florida and make such data available to all segments of the community;
  • To lessen the burdens of government;
  • To combat community deterioration; and to do all lawful acts incidental to the accomplishment of said charitable and educational purposes. The sole member of the Foundation is The Miami‐Dade Beacon Council, Inc.

For more information on The Beacon Council Foundation, visit: www.beaconcouncilfoundation.org

Digital Health Start-Up HealthSnap expands in Miami creating 65 jobs and over $1.5 million in investment over the next three years

(Miami, FL– December 3, 2020) – HealthSnap, a Remote Patient Monitoring company for virtual chronic condition management, to create 65 jobs and invest more than $1.5 million over the next three years as part of a major expansion announcement in Miami.

Founded in 2015, HealthSnap is an example of a successful start-up in Miami-Dade County that has grown out of the community’s existing life sciences ecosystem. The company was launched by five University of Miami alumni—one of whom is CEO, Samson Magid — who together have grown the business at the CIC, which houses the largest concentration of life science companies in Miami-Dade County.  The company will initially expand at its current location in the Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC) Miami. In collaboration with the Miami-Dade Beacon Council and Enterprise Florida, HealthSnap was awarded the State of Florida’s Qualified Target Industry tax refund for 65 new hires.

“The Miami-Dade Beacon Council and Enterprise Florida were extremely helpful in identifying HealthSnap as a candidate for the QTI initiative and providing guidance throughout the approval process,” said Samson Magid, CEO, HealthSnap. “We are very appreciative of their ongoing efforts to support HealthSnap’s growth and innovation in Miami, and we are excited to continue this partnership going forward.”

“This is an all-around success story that showcases a home-grown entrepreneur along with collaboration with local organizations,” said Michael A. Finney, President, and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “With projects like these, Miami-Dade County continues to lead the healthcare economy in the Southeast United States, serving more than 2.75 million residents across nearly two dozen industry subsectors. With a diverse population of all ages and ethnicities, Miami-Dade County is on the cutting edge of patient care, healthcare delivery, and healthcare innovation in the United States.”

HealthSnap’s Remote Patient Monitoring programs enable healthcare organizations to extend their patient care to the home in order to manage chronic conditions proactively. Since its commercial launch in 2020, HealthSnap has successfully deployed its Remote Patient Monitoring program with over 30 physician groups, 5 enterprise health systems, and nearly 4,000 patients in its phase 1 roll-out this year.

“This is a great Florida story and proves that we are fast becoming the best place for innovators to make their mark,” said Florida Secretary of Commerce Jamal Sowell, also Enterprise Florida’s President & CEO. “HealthSnap is doing great work and we are glad they have chosen Florida to further expand their mission.”

“HealthSnap’s mission is to empower people with their health data anytime, anywhere, so that they can become active participants in their own health. Our goal is to impact millions of lives through our virtual chronic disease management programs and thereby fundamentally shift the paradigm of healthcare to one that is more proactive, remote, and continuous,” said Samson Magid, CEO, HealthSnap. “As we continue to grow and carry out our mission, we are proud to be committed to hiring from the talent pool in HealthSnap’s home city of Miami. Over the next three years, we will be carrying out our expansion initiative with new hires in our operations, technology, and sales teams.”

In the wake of the COVID-19 global health crisis, HealthSnap’s Remote Patient Monitoring solution is a critical example of how healthcare organizations are adopting technology to continue to deliver exceptional care to vulnerable chronic disease patients around the country. The company is actively hiring local Miami-Dade County talent and expects to begin its expansion investment and hiring immediately.

About HealthSnap

HealthSnap is a remote patient monitoring platform for virtual chronic disease management. By making personalized and actionable health data accessible to everyone, HealthSnap empowers people living with chronic conditions anytime, anywhere. The company combines a comprehensive Remote Patient Monitoring Platform with remote care services that make it simple and profitable for healthcare organizations to improve patient outcomes, reduce readmissions, and lower the cost of care with virtual chronic disease management programs.

 

To learn more about HealthSnap, please visit healthsnap.io.

Media Contact:

Sunny Ghia

sunny@healthsnap.io

(610) 442-4463

 

New Officers, Board Of Directors & Committee Leadership For The 2020-2021 Fiscal Year

—Leaders from the public and private sector commit to local economic development efforts—

 

MIAMI, FL – December 1, 2020 – The Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the County’s official public-private economic development partnership, is pleased to announce the 2020-2021 Board of Directors and slate of new officers and committee leadership. The Board of Directors consists of volunteer leaders from the community’s leading businesses, community organizations, educational institutions, nonprofits, and local governance, and provides leadership and governance for the 501 (c)6.

Led by Chair Gary M. Goldfarb, Chief Strategy Officer, Interport Group of Companies, the 2020-2021 Officers include Chair-Elect, George Bermudez, Senior Vice President, Bank of America; Treasurer Olga Ramudo, President and CEO, Express Travel; Secretary Yolanda Cash Jackson, Shareholder, Becker; and Michael A. Finney, President and Chief Executive Officer, Miami-Dade Beacon Council.

“The Beacon Council is the steward for the county-wide economic development plan, One Community One Goal, which strengthens and diversifies the economy by bringing companies providing high paying jobs to our community. We count on partners from both the private and public sector to support these objectives, enabling us to deliver on our mission to market, grow and shape Miami-Dade’s economy,” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “We thank all of our volunteers for their time, collaboration and guidance… their leadership and investment allow us, as an organization, to help drive long-term positive change for our community.”

As Chief Strategy Officer of the Interport Group of Companies, a leading supply chain management company, incoming Chair Gary M. Goldfarb has long been active with The Beacon Council, especially its Trade and Logistics Committee. Gary leads a team that provides Foreign Trade Zones and customs- bonded warehousing, inventory control, transportation, distribution services and fulfillment and duty drawback expertise. With Interport, Gary has developed several key business units including “Compra Fora” Brasil Customs Clearance Center in Miami, GPS Tracking and Location Technology, Foreign Trade Zone and Trade Facilitation Consulting (over 100 FTZ activations in the past 6 years), and Supply Chain Engineering.

“Having served on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of The Beacon Council for more than 15 years, I have seen firsthand the impact that this organization has had on our community and the growth of its economy,” said Gary Goldfarb, 2020-2021 Chair. “This year’s challenges make economic development efforts even more important, and I am committed to working with the Council, our incredible Board of Directors, and our local leaders to ensure we are doing everything we can to support Miami-Dade’s recovery and continued success.”

In addition to new Board members, the Miami-Dade Beacon Council announces the new Chairs and Chairs-Elect for the ten committees created to better engage Beacon Council investors and thought leaders with the One Community One Goal strategy to foster economic prosperity throughout Miami-Dade. The Target Industry and Program Committees include Aviation; Banking & Finance; Creative Industries; International; Life Sciences & Healthcare, New Leaders Taskforce; Small Business; Technology; Trade & Logistics; and the Urban Initiatives Taskforce. Each committee’s goal is to help build greater capacity within target industries and key markets to support growth and innovation, while providing opportunities for professional engagement. The full list of Committee Chairs and Chairs-Elect is included below.

 

The Beacon Council’s 2020-2021 Board of Directors is outlined below. List of Board Members with links to bios and headshots can be found here.

2020-2021 Officers Cabinet

Full list of 2020-2021 Target Industry and Program Committee Chairs and Chairs-Elect:

 

  • Aviation Committee
    • Klemen Ferjan, Amerijet
    • Santiago Saltos, Airbus
  • Banking & Finance Committee
    • Bernard J. Adrover, City National Bank
    • Gonzalo Acevedo, BAC Florida Bank
  • International Committee
    • Andrew J. Markus, Carlton Fields
    • Gina Polo, Buchanan Ingersoll Rooney
  • Life Sciences & Healthcare Committee
    • Richard J. Bookman, University of Miami
    • Ardith Bronson, DLA Piper
  • New Leaders Taskforce
    • Kevin Gonzalez, CBRE
    • Ana Rodriguez, Florida Blue
  • Small Business Committee
    • Carole Ann Taylor, Miami To Go, Inc.
    • John Anthony Hall, Brickell Ventures
  • Technology Committe
    • Ken Finnerran, Kaseya
    • Juha Mikkola, Wyncode Academy
  • Trade & Logistics Committee
    • Lewis Greenberg, Marcum, LLP
    • Basil Khalil, FedEx Express
  • Creative Industries Committee
    • Lorraine Medici, Perry Ellis
  • Urban Initiative Taskforce
    • Yolanda Cash Jackson, Becker
    • Felecia Hatcher, Code Fever Miami

 

For more information, please visit www.beaconcouncil.com,
or click here for more information and list of Board Members.

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About the MiamiDade Beacon Council

The Miami‐Dade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,200 businesses to expand in or relocate to Miami-Dade, creating more than 104,000 direct and indirect jobs combined, and driving more than $6.7 billion in new capital investments. A professional staff and volunteer community leaders work together to promote Miami-Dade as a world‐class business community at the forefront of a changing global economy, driving long-term growth and prosperity for the region. For more information, visit: www.beaconcouncil.com.

 

October 2020 Employment Report

The numbers analyzed

In October 2020, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 8.8 percent. The County had a reduction of 74,900 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from October 2019 to October 2020 which was a 6.1 percentage point decrease. From September 2020 to October 2020, there was an increase of 9,900 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 0.9 percentage point increase.

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (October 2019 with October 2020). The sectors most affected are Leisure & Hospitality (-26,900), Total Government (-13,200), Education & Health Services (-11,900), Professional & Business Services (-7,200), Retail Trade (-6,600), Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities (-5,300), and Other Services (-4,700). The sectors seeing some improvements in the past 12 months are Construction (+1,400), Manufacturing (+1,100), and Financial Activities (+900). The graph below shows the payroll data since October 2018.

From October 2019 to October 2020 there was a reduction of 74,900 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From September 2020 to October 2020 there was an increase of 9,900 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

 

 

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between September 2020 and October 2020 shows that several sectors have added jobs, including in sectors that were the hardest hit during the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. These sectors include Leisure and Hospitality (+3,400), Retail (+2,300), Education and Health Services (+1,800) Manufacturing (+1,200), and Wholesale Trade (+1,000)

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 8.9 percent compared to last year is 6.9 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 2.0 percent in October 2019. Compared to September 2020 there was a 3.6 percentage point decrease from the unemployment rate at 12.5 percent.

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida.  The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS).  There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model.  The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since October 2018.

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

In October 2020, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 8.8 percent, which is 6.8 percentage points higher than in October 2019. The unemployment rate is 3.8 percentage points lower than in September 2020 when it was at 12.6 percent.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers. 

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

 

Bank of America Gives Florida International University, Miami Dade College and University of Puerto Rico $1 Million Each for Jobs Initiative

Bank of America Gives Florida International University, Miami Dade College
and University of Puerto Rico $1 Million Each for Jobs Initiative

$25 Million National Program Supports Programming, Re-skilling, and Upskilling for Students of Color; Includes Partnerships with Major Employers and The Aspen Institute

MIAMI —Bank of America today announced a new $1 million jobs initiative partnership with Florida International University (FIU), Miami Dade College (MDC) and University of Puerto Rico to help students of color successfully complete the education and training necessary to enter the workforce and embark on a path to success in Miami. This initiative builds on Bank of America’s ongoing work to address the underlying issues facing individuals and communities of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the current health crisis.

 

“We understand the important role skills development and training plays in advancing racial equity so students of color can thrive in our community,” said Gene Schaefer, Miami market president for Bank of America. “Bank of America is proud to partner with FIU, MDC and University of Puerto Rico to ensure their students have access to high-quality training that will empower them to pursue opportunities and have a positive impact on economic justice and mobility.”

 

This year, the bank provided $2,330,000 in grants to nonprofits that are connecting individuals to skills and employment in Miami. The initiative is part of the bank’s recent $1 billion, four-year commitment to advance racial equality and economic opportunity, and its $25 million commitment to enhance up-skilling and reskilling for Black/African American and Hispanic-Latino individuals.

Including FIU, MDC and University of Puerto Rico, the $25 million, nationwide initiative includes partnerships with nearly two dozen community colleges that serve predominately Black/African American and Hispanic-Latino students, public historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and public Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). Bank of America is also partnering with and providing funding to the Aspen Institute to convene the participating higher education institutions for technical and programmatic assistance and to share best practices.

 

Today, less than 40 percent of community college students earn a certificate or degree within six years of enrollment. For students of color, graduation and completion rates are particularly low – 28.8 percent for Black students and 37.1 percent for Hispanic students. Although HBCUs and HSIs are a mix of public and private institutions, the ongoing challenges brought on by coronavirus, have exacerbated their financial struggle as they seek to serve students from the most vulnerable communities.

“Over the past two years we have created a framework to give our learners the skills they need to enter or get promoted in specific industries. Our framework includes the design and delivery of micro-credentials,” said Elizabeth Bejar, senior vice president for academic and student affairs at FIU. “This grant from Bank of America will allow us to expand our programs and make a transformative impact at a critical time when so many in our community are unemployed or underemployed.”

 

“Re-skilling, upskilling, retooling and completing a college certificate or degree have never been more important,” said Dr. Rolando Montoya, interim president of Miami Dade College. “This endeavor will go a long way in helping those who need it most.”

 

With the support from Bank of America, FIU and MDC will develop or enhance existing programs to meet specific skills gaps to create higher paying, family-sustaining jobs that are in demand. Bank of America will work alongside the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the official economic development partnership for Miami-Dade County, to ensure these programs target specific hiring needs and create a clearly defined career pathway to future employment.

 

“The investment of partners like Bank of America is essential to driving equitable economic inclusion in any community,” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “Working closely with our academic institutions and the private sector to ensure workforce and talent development efforts are forward-thinking and inclusive, it is collaboration and commitments like these that allow us to drive long-term, positive change for Miami-Dade as a whole – starting with underserved Black and Brown talent.”

 

Focused on advancing economic mobility, Bank of America also recently announced:

 

About Bank of America
At Bank of America, we’re guided by a common purpose to help make financial lives better, through the power of every connection. We’re delivering on this through responsible growth with a focus on our environmental, social and governance (ESG) leadership. ESG is embedded across our eight lines of business and reflects how we help fuel the global economy, build trust and credibility, and represent a company that people want to work for, invest in and do business with. It’s demonstrated in the inclusive and supportive workplace we create for our employees, the responsible products and services we offer our clients, and the impact we make around the world in helping local economies thrive. An important part of this work is forming strong partnerships with nonprofits and advocacy groups, such as community, consumer and environmental organizations, to bring together our collective networks and expertise to achieve greater impact. Learn more at about.bankofamerica.com, and connect with us on Twitter (@BofA_News).

For more Bank of America news, including dividend announcements and other important information, visit the Bank of America newsroom and register for email alerts.

www.bankofamerica.com

About FIU
Florida International University is Miami’s public research university, focused on student success. According to U.S. News and World Report, FIU has 26 top-50 rankings in the nation among public universities and Washington Monthly Magazine ranks FIU among the top 20 public universities contributing to the public good and No. 12 for social mobility. FIU is a top U.S. research university (R1), with more than $200 million in annual expenditures. FIU ranks 15th in the nation among public universities for patent production, which drives innovation, and is one of the institutions that helps make Florida the top state for higher education. The Next Horizon fundraising campaign is furthering FIU’s commitment to providing students Worlds Ahead opportunities. Today, FIU has two campuses and multiple centers, and supports artistic and cultural engagement through its three museums: Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, the Wolfsonian-FIU, and the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU. FIU is a member of Conference USA, with more than 400 student-athletes participating in 18 sports. The university has awarded more than 330,000 degrees to many leaders in South Florida and beyond. For more information about FIU, visit www.fiu.edu.

 

About Miami Dade College

Miami Dade College is the most diverse institution in the nation. There are 167 nations and 63 languages represented in its student body. The college’s eight campuses and outreach centers offer more than 300 distinct degree pathways including associate and baccalaureate degrees, career certificates and apprenticeships. Baccalaureate degree offerings include biological sciences, engineering, data analytics, information systems technology, education, public safety, supervision and management, nursing, physician assistant studies, film and others.  MDC is the recipient of many top national awards including the Aspen Prize. As Democracy’s College, MDC changes lives through accessible, high quality-teaching and learning experiences.  It is the home of the Miami Culinary Institute, the Miami Animation & Gaming International Complex, the Miami Fashion Institute, the Eig-Watson School of Aviation, The Idea Center, the Cybersecurity Center of the Americas, the Cloud Computing Center, the Center for Learning, Innovation and Simulation, the School for Advanced Studies, and the New World School of the Arts, to name a few of its most innovative programs.  MDC has been named among the nation’s “Great Colleges to Work For” since the program’s inception.  The College embraces its responsibility to serve as an economic, cultural, and civic leader for the advancement of our diverse global community. Its alumni and employees contribute more than $3 billion annually to the local economy, and MDC graduates occupy top leadership positions in every major industry. MDC is renowned for its rich cultural programming. It is the home of the Miami Book Fair, Miami Film Festival, the National Historic Landmark Miami Freedom Tower, the Tower Theater, Dyer Building, Koubek Center Mansion and Gardens, Live Arts Miami at MDC, the Lynn and Louis Wolfson II Florida Moving Image Archives, the Museum of Art and Design, a sculpture park and a large campus art gallery and theater system.  MDC has admitted more than 2,000,000 students and counting, since it opened its doors in 1960. More than 120,000 students are currently enrolled. For more information, visit www.mdc.edu.

 

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Reporters May Contact:

Matthew Daily, Bank of America, 1.404.607.2844
matthew.daily@bofa.com

 

 

Matt Haggman Joins The Miami-Dade Beacon Council As Executive Vice President, One Community One Goal

 

Community leader, former Knight Foundation Director and Past OCOG Co-Chair brings his passion for Miami to
community-wide strategic initiative focused on shaping Miami-Dade County’s economic future

  

MIAMI, FL – NOVEMBER 9, 2020 – The Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the County’s official public-private economic development partnership, today announced that Matt Haggman has joined the organization as Executive Vice President, One Community One Goal. In this role, Matt leads the efforts of the community-wide strategic initiative focused on shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Matt is well-versed in the collaborative platform, having Co-Chaired One Community One Goal (OCOG) with Baptist Health South Florida’s Nelson Lazo and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez from 2015 to 2017.

“I’m thrilled to join The Beacon Council team and embrace the opportunity to work with them on shaping Miami’s economic future via One Community One Goal,” says Matt. “But in addition to thinking about the future, we are confronted with the urgent needs of the present. Namely, assisting small business owners, entrepreneurs and people across our community recover from this economic crisis. I am eager to participate in the work of rebuilding our economy during this very difficult time.”

“We are excited to have Matt join us as the Executive Vice President spearheading One Community One Goal,” says Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “An experienced leader committed to Miami’s long-term growth, Matt brings with him a real understanding of the collaboration, innovation and investment required to maximize OCOG’s positive impact. The present economic climate presents a new set of challenges that we can only address successfully by working together. I am confident that his strategic vision and passion for innovation will prove to be valuable assets as we craft new solutions and pathways for Miami-Dade’s residents and businesses to grow.”

In his previous role as Miami Director at Knight Foundation, Matt created and built the Foundation’s program focused on propelling high-growth entrepreneurs and civic innovators as a way to drive innovation, expand opportunity and stir greater community engagement. Numerous efforts funded and supported under Matt’s leadership are now pillars of Miami’s rapidly growing entrepreneurial ecosystem, including Endeavor Miami, The Idea Center at Miami Dade College, eMerge Americas, Center for Black Innovation, 500 Startups Miami, and Babson’s Women Innovating Now Lab.

Prior to joining Knight Foundation, Matt was an award-winning journalist with The Miami Herald and Daily Business Review. Matt covered business, government and investigative stories of local and national importance. Work he led or contributed to resulted in consumer protection reforms in Tallahassee, an overhaul of Miami-Dade County government, and changes to voting systems in Florida. Matt’s awards include the Gerald Loeb Award, the highest honor in business journalism.

Actively involved with numerous organizations across the community, Matt is currently a founding Board Member of Endeavor Miami, a Trustee at New World Symphony and advisor to national non-profit Right to Start. He has been a mentor with Big Brothers Big Sisters Miami for more than a decade. Several years ago, Matt joined with friends to launch TEDxMiami, which continues today under a new generation of leaders.

Originally from Boston, Matt has called Miami home for almost 20 years, building relationships and investing himself in its growth. Charged with rallying the community around a unified vision to create a better quality of life for Miami-Dade residents, he will work with OCOG’s Academic Leaders Council, local business and community leaders, and the rest of The Beacon Council team to foster the development and expansion of the seven priorities at the core of this collaborative strategy: Physical Infrastructure and Resiliency; Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Education and Workforce Development; Business Climate and Policy; Leadership; Economic Development Marketing; and Target Industries. Matt will partner closely with recently announced One Community One Goal Co-Chairs Juan Carlos Liscano, Vice President for Miami, the Caribbean and Latin America, American Airlines; Tony Argiz, Chairman and CEO, MBAF; and Miami-Dade County Mayor-Elect Daniella Levine Cava.

“One Community One Goal is a community-wide effort. It only works if it continues to be of, by and for the community,” says Matt. “As always, the starting point in an effort like this is listening. I look forward to engaging with community leaders, business owners, workers and entrepreneurs across our community as we, together, build an economy that is even more innovative, inclusive and sustainable.”

 

For Matt Haggman’s bio, please click here; headshot, please click here.

For more on the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, click here.

For more on One Community One Goal, click here.

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About the MiamiDade Beacon Council
The Miami‐Dade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,200 businesses to expand in or relocate to Miami-Dade, creating more than 104,000 direct and indirect jobs combined, and driving more than $6.7 billion in new capital investments. A professional staff and volunteer community leaders work together to promote Miami-Dade as a world‐class business community at the forefront of a changing global economy, driving long-term growth and prosperity for the region. For more information, visit: www.beaconcouncil.com.

About One Community One Goal (OCOG)
One Community One Goal is a roadmap for Miami-Dade County’s future economic development success. This initiative provides a collaborative platform that promotes community-wide economic development and prosperity in Miami-Dade County, by driving innovation, leveraging strengths, providing clear thought leadership, and coalescing public and private priorities. One Community One Goal brings together a broad spectrum of Miami-Dade organizations, working to advance the goal of a thriving, inclusive and diverse community.