Miami-Dade County Continues Adding Jobs as Economy Recovers From COVID

Key Takeaways

  • The June 2021 unemployment rate improved compared to last year.
    • The June 2021 unemployment rate decreased by 3% compared to last year. The unemployment rate increased slightly by 0.4% compared to last month.
    • Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates, which take seasonal fluctuations into consideration, continue to show a downward trend in unemployment rates.
  • Miami-Dade County adds thousands of jobs this June.
    • When analyzing the numbers by sector, most sectors experienced an increase in the number of jobs.
    • Nonagricultural payroll jobs increased by 45,300 from June 2020 to June 2021, a 4.1% increase. This was the third largest increase in Florida after the Orlando and Tampa areas.
    • There was a decrease of 5,700 nonagricultural payroll jobs, a 0.5% decrease from May 2021 to June 2021.This is due to the end of the academic school year when many of the employees of Miami-Dade County Public Schools who are on 10-month contracts are counted as not employed. In August, when schools start, they will be added to the payroll data again.

 

Unemployment Rate in Miami-Dade County (not seasonally adjusted)

As Miami-Dade County is slowly returning to life after the pandemic, unemployment rates have decreased in the last few months at the local and national levels. This June’s unemployment report shows that the unemployment rate decreased by 3% compared to June of 2020. The unemployment rate increased by 0.4%, from 6.7% in May 2021 to 7.1% in June 2021.

 

Note: The Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since June of 2020.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs (not seasonally adjusted) – Miami-Dade County

  • Nonagricultural payroll jobs increased by 45,300 from June 2020 to June 2021; a 4.1% increase.
  • There was a decrease of 5,700 nonagricultural payroll jobs, a 0.5% decrease from May 2021 to June 2021.This is due to the end of the academic school year when many of the employees of Miami-Dade County Public Schools who are on 10-month contracts are counted as not employed. In August, when schools start, they will be added to the payroll data again.
  • When analyzing the numbers by sector, most sectors experienced an increase in the number of jobs.

 

The table below shows that most industries experienced an increase in the number of jobs compared to May of 2021 and to last year. The industries with the largest gains from May of 2021 include manufacturing and other services. Industries experiencing the largest gains since June of 2020 include leisure and hospitality and other services. This is to be expected as the hospitality industry lost the largest numbers of jobs at the beginning of the pandemic. Government, and education and health services show the lowest job growth from May to June of 2021.

 

Nonagricultural Employment

Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall MD (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

 

 

May 2021 to June 2021 change

June 2020 to June 2021 change

Industry

Level

PercentLevel

Percent

Leisure and Hospitality

2,300

2.0%19,100

19.7%

Professional and Business Services

900

0.5%17,500

10.4%

Other Services

1,300

2.8%5,300

12.3%

Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities

1,800

2.3%4,100

5.4%

Financial Activities

800

1%4,000

5%

Retail Trade

300

0.2%3,800

3%

Manufacturing

1,300

3.2%1,200

3%

Information

-100

-0.5%400

2.2%

Wholesale Trade

-500

-0.7%-600

-0.9%

Education and Health Services

-4,800

-2.6%-1,500

-0.8%

Construction

-900

-1.8%-3,400

-6.3%

 

All Counties shown below have improved unemployment rates compared to June of 2020, with Palm Beach County showing the lowest rate.

 

 

June 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
June 2020 to June 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)
Miami-Dade County

7.1%

-3.0%

Broward County

5.7%

-8.3%

Palm Beach County

5.3%

-6.2%

Florida

5.7%

-6.0%

United States

6.1%

-5.1%

 

Unemployment Rate Decreases in Miami-Dade County (seasonally adjusted)

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates, which take seasonal fluctuations into consideration, show a downward trend in unemployment rates. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County is 7.3% for June of 2021, which is 2.7% lower than in June of 2020. This June’s unemployment rate is 0.1% lower than the previous month.

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe lower unemployment rates, which signals economic recovery. The community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

 

Sources

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.
In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

 

Miami Community Ventures Launches New Initiatives, Sets Bold Goals for Year Two

Skills-development and job-placement programing considered critical
to support Miami’s immense business growth

MIAMI, FL – JUNE 29, 2021 – While technology and finance companies flock to Greater Miami, the Beacon Council Foundation’s Miami Community Ventures (MCV) connects low-income, structurally-unemployed individuals to living wage jobs and long-term career pathways to stay on-track with the city’s growth.

 

MCV provides wraparound support services to participants for up to one year after being hired, allowing them to focus on retention, development, and success. The program has raised close to $2 Million to-date – including six-figure grants from partners like JPMorgan Chase, Florida Blue, and Miami-Dade County – and placed more than 80 people in jobs since October 2020, with an average wage that significantly exceeds the living wage target. All participants are low-income residents, close to 85% are in communities with poverty rates of 20% or higher, and more than 50% are returning citizens.

 

Closing out a successful first year in 2020, MCV is launching two initiatives in 2021 with the help of a combined 50+ partners, supporters, and funders:

  • Small Business Entrepreneurship Track: With support from founding sponsor Bank of America, the entrepreneurship track launched this month, and targets small community businesses that can scale with the right support. This track will offer toolkits to help female-owned Black and Latinx early-stage businesses grow, including hands-on coaching, mentorship, and premium access to procurement and funding opportunities.
  • The Bean Automotive Group Apprenticeship Program: MCV brought together three organizations, The Bean Automotive Group, Miami Dade College, and CareerSource South Florida, to create career pathways for Miami-Dade residents that help serve the urgent talent needs of employers. Participants become certified automotive technician specialists upon successful completion of the program, which blends classroom instruction and on-the-job training for living wage jobs.

 

“These new initiatives launched by the Miami Community Ventures program are doing the important work of investing in the economic stability and development of our residents, which is critical for a growing community like Miami-Dade. MCV helps local talent keep pace with our rapidly evolving local economy while also serving developing businesses with a strong talent pipeline.” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “This is a great way for newly arriving and long-standing Miami-Dade companies to invest in the development of this community and its workforce.”

 

The initiatives launched this year will help MCV achieve its 2021 goal of placing 280 people in living-wage jobs, almost doubling the number of placements from 2020.

 

The Small Business Entrepreneurship track will primarily serve Black and Latinx women entrepreneurs. “At Bank of America, we know it is critical for small businesses to have the right tools to create sustainable growth. Their success stimulates local job creation and drives positive economic impact where it is needed most,” said Gene Schaefer, President, Bank of America Miami. “By investing in the Beacon Council Foundation’s Miami Community Ventures program, we are empowering female entrepreneurs to break barriers and make a direct impact on our local community and economy.”

 

The Bean Automotive Apprenticeship Program will provide stable career pathways to those needing it most, “It is our priority to stay up-to-date with the latest automotive technology and certifications. This program helps our community keep up with these ever-changing requirements,” said George Wiltz, Bean Auto Group Chief Financial Officer. “We are investing in apprentice technicians, providing a pathway to a rewarding career, and creating a strong talent pipeline within our industry for years to come. This is an exciting venture, and we are proud to partner with Miami-Dade College, CareerSource South Florida and The Beacon Council in serving our community.”

 

For Miami-Dade County, the rate of unemployment and poverty in underserved communities often exceeds national, state, and comparable county-wide averages. Unemployment impacts poverty, recidivism, and crime rates. Designed to deliver long-term inclusive economic benefits to local communities over a state-audited five-year period, MCV addresses core unemployment issues and delivers solutions that positively impact individuals, families, employers, and communities for generations to come.

 

Led by Sheri Colas Gervais, Vice President and Executive Director of Miami Community Ventures, the program’s strategic advisory group includes George Acevedo, Divisional Director/Managing Director, JPMorgan Chase Bank; Eduardo Padron, PhD, President Emeritus, Miami Dade College; and Penny Shaffer, PhD, Market President – South Florida, Florida Blue; with support from Matt Haggman, Executive Vice President, One Community One Goal, and Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, Miami-Dade Beacon Council.

 

MCV is grateful to its funders such as Allegany Franciscan Ministries; Bank of America; Bank United; Baptist Health South Florida; Deloitte; Florida Blue; JPMorgan Chase; OIC South Florida; TD Foundation; Truist Foundation; and Uber. MCV would not be possible without the help of supporters such as Miami-Dade County and CareerSource South Florida.

 

About Miami Community Ventures, a Beacon Council Foundation Initiative

Miami Community Ventures, a Beacon Council Foundation initiative, is a collective impact initiative that connects low-income, structurally unemployed individuals to living wage jobs and long-term career pathways. The Miami‐Dade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. The Beacon Council Foundation, Inc. is a Florida Not-for-Profit Corporation created exclusively for charitable and educational purposes to publish Miami‐Dade County Florida statistical data, lessen the burdens of government, and combat community deterioration. More information can be found at https://www.beaconcouncilfoundation.org/mcv or contact Sheri Colas Gervais, at scolas@beaconcouncil.com.

 

 

Miami-Dade County’s Unemployment Rate Continues to Drop, Job Growth is Among the Highest in Florida

Key Takeaways

  • Miami-Dade’s unemployment rate continues to improve as the area recovers from COVID-19.
    • In May 2021, the unemployment rate decreased to 6.7% compared to 10.3% in May of 2020; a decrease of 3.6%. Compared to last month (April), the unemployment rate decreased by 0.2%.
    • Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates, which take seasonal fluctuations into consideration, also show a downward trend in unemployment rates.
  • Miami-Dade County adds thousands of jobs this May.
    • Miami-Dade County had the third highest job growth in Florida with 82,100 jobs added between May 2020 to May 2021, a 7.7% increase.
    • The monthly number of jobs added also increased. From April 2021 to May 2021, there was an increase of 3,400 nonagricultural payroll jobs. State government, and leisure and hospitality showed the largest increase.

 

 

Unemployment Rate Improves in Miami-Dade County (not seasonally adjusted)

As Miami-Dade County is slowly returning to life after the pandemic, unemployment rates have decreased at the local and national levels. The unemployment rate decreased to 6.7% from May of 2020, a decrease of 3.6%. Compared to last month (April), the unemployment rate decreased by 0.2% from 6.9% to 6.7%. This happened when a the total labor force increased indicating that people are returning to work or looking for work. And the number of unemployed declined as well.

 

Note: The Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since May of 2020.

 

Nonagricultural Payroll Jobs (not seasonally adjusted) – Miami-Dade County

  • From April 2021 to May 2021, there was an increase of 3,400 nonagricultural payroll jobs, a 0.3% increase. Most sectors experienced an increase in the number of jobs, with state government and leisure and hospitality showing the largest increase.
  • Nonagricultural payroll jobs increased by 82,100 from May 2020 to May 2021, a 7.7% increase.

 

The table below shows that most industries experienced an increase in the number of jobs compared to the last month (April). The industries with the largest gains include leisure and hospitality and other services. The same industries experienced a significant number of new jobs compared to May of 2020. This is to be expected as the hospitality industry lost the largest numbers of jobs at the beginning of the pandemic. Professional and business services, and education and health services show the lowest job growth from April to May of 2021.

 

Nonagricultural Employment

Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall MD (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

 

April 2021 to May 2021 change

May 2020 to May 2021 change

Industry

Level

PercentLevel

Percent

Leisure and Hospitality

2,500

2.3%34,400

43.7%

Retail Trade

-300

-0.2%14,700

12.6%

Other Services

700

1.5%6,700

16.6%

Professional and Business Services

-2,100

-1.1%19,100

11.5%

Manufacturing

0

0.0%900

2.3%

Education and Health Services

-800

-0.4%4,600

2.5%

Financial Activities

600

0.7%3,600

4.6%

Wholesale Trade

100

0.1%800

1.2%

Construction

500

1.0%-1,100

-2.1%

Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities

1,000

1.3%2,800

3.7%

Information

100

0.5%300

1.7%

Total Government

1,100

0.8%-4,700

-3.3%

 

All Counties shown below have improved unemployment rates compared to May of 2020, with Palm Beach County showing the lowest rate.

 

 

 

May 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)

May 2020 to May 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County

6.7%

-3.6%

Broward County

5.2%

-12.2%

Palm Beach County

4.6%

-9.7%

Florida

5.0%

-9.3%

United States

5.5%

-7.5%

 

Unemployment Rate Improves in Miami-Dade County (seasonally adjusted)

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates, which take seasonal fluctuations into consideration, also show a downward trend in unemployment rates. In May 2021, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County was 7.4%, which is 2.8% lower than in May 2020 (10.2%). The unemployment rate is 0.3% lower than in April of 2021 when it was at 7.7%.

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe lower unemployment rates, which signals economic recovery. The community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

 

Sources

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.
In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

 

Miami-Dade County’s Unemployment Rate Drops to 6.9%

Key Takeaways

  • The unemployment rate continues to improve as the area recovers from COVID-19.
  • In April 2021, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.9%, an improvement compared to March’s unemployment rate of 8.2%.
  • Compared to April of 2020, non-agricultural payroll jobs have increased significantly. o Almost all sectors added jobs between April 2020 and 2021 with Leisure & Hospitality, Professional & Business Services and Retail Trade adding the most jobs.
  • The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has also decreased compared to March of 2021 and April of 2020.
  • As with economic recoveries in the past, labor force data will see ups and downs between individual months, but over a longer period shows improvements. The same applies to overall economic recovery trends. Labor data may fluctuate depending on the time of the year or number of people feeling confident about their job prospects and getting back into the labor force.

 

Unemployment Rate Improves in Miami-Dade County (not seasonally adjusted)

As Miami-Dade County is slowly returning to life after the pandemic, unemployment rates have decreased at the local and national levels. The unemployment rate decreased by 3.4% from April of 2020 (10.3%) to April of 2021 (6.9%). Compared to last month (March), the unemployment rate decreased by 1.3% from 8.2% to 6.9%.

 

Note: The Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since April of 2020.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs (not seasonally adjusted) – Miami-Dade County

  • From March 2021 to April 2021, there was a decrease of 1,700 nonagricultural payroll jobs, a decrease of -0.1%. A few sectors, including government saw a decline in the number of employees.
  • Nonagricultural payroll jobs increased by 103,400 from April 2020 to April 2021, a 10% increase.

 

Although most industries did not experience a great increase in number of jobs compared to March, most industries gained jobs compared to April of 2020. These industries include professional and business services, other services and leisure and hospitality. The leisure and hospitality industry experienced the highest increase in jobs with 57% increase from April of 2020. This was to be expected as this industry also lost the largest number of jobs at the beginning of the pandemic.

Nonagricultural Employment

Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall MD (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

 March 2021 to April 2021 changeApr 2020 to April 2021 change
IndustryLevelPercentLevelPercent
Leisure and Hospitality1,0000.9%40,20057.0%
Retail Trade-300-0.2%18,80016.6%
Other Services8001.8%6,60016.6%
Professional and Business Services2,4001.3%23,80014.7%
Manufacturing-300-0.7%3,4009.2%
Education and Health Services-100-0.1%8,8004.9%
Financial Activities5000.6%3,5004.5%
Wholesale Trade1000.1%1,8002.7%
Construction-1,400-2.7%8001.6%
Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities-2,400-3.0%1,2001.6%
Information-100-0.5%00.0%
Total Government-1,900-1.4%-5,500-3.8%

All Counties shown below have improved unemployment rates compared to April of 2020, with Palm Beach County showing the lowest rate.

 

 

April 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)

April 2020 to April 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County

6.9%

+3.4%
Broward County

5.3%

+11.1%

Palm Beach County

4.7%

+10%

Florida

5.1%

+8.8%

United States

6.6%

+8.7%

 

Unemployment Rate Improves in Miami-Dade County (seasonally adjusted)

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates, which take seasonal fluctuations into consideration, also show a downward trend in unemployment rates. In April 2021, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County was 7.7%, which is 2.6% lower than in April 2020 (10.3%). The unemployment rate is 0.4% lower than in March of 2021 when it was at 8.1%.

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe lower unemployment rates, which signals economic recovery. The community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

 

Sources

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.
In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.
 

March 2021 Employment Report

The numbers analyzed

 In March 2021, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 8.2 percent. From February 2021 to March 2021, there was an increase of 7,800 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 0.7 percentage point increase. Many sectors have begun adding jobs. The County had a reduction of 82,500 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from March 2020 to March 2021 which was a 6.8 percentage point decrease, still reflecting the COVID-19 crisis.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (March 2020 with March 2021). This is in particularly true when comparing the three months leading up to the COVID-19 crisis to the first three months of 2021. The graph below shows the payroll data since November 2018.

 

 

Between March 2020 and March 2021, every sector saw a decrease in the number of non-agricultural payroll jobs. At the same time, the change in non-agricultural payroll job between February 2021 and March 2021 shows that many sectors are adding jobs during that time period.

 

 

SectorMarch 2020- March 2021February 2021 – March 2021
Professional & Business Services-100 (-0.1%)+1,800 (+1.0%)
Financial Activities-900 (-1.1%)+800 (+1.0%)
Manufacturing -1,300 (-3.1%)0 (+0.0%)
Information-1,700 (-8.4%)+100 (-0.5%)
Construction-2,100 (-3.9%)+300 (+0.6%)
Wholesale Trade-4,100 (-5.6%)+800 (-1.2%)
Other Services-4,400 (-8.8%)+600 (+1.3%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-6,200 (-7.2%)+2,000 (-2.6%)
Total Government-7,300 (-5.0%)+200 (+0.1%)
Retail Trade-9,100 (-6.4%)+200 (-0.2%)
Education & Health Services-10,400 (-5.3%)-1,200 (-0.6%)
Leisure and Hospitality-34,900 (-24.2%)+2,200 (+2.1%)

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

 

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in March of 2021 at 8.2 percent is 6 percent points higher than in March of 2020. When comparing unemployment rate monthly, the unemployment rate of March 2021 is 0.3 percentage points higher than the previous month, February 2021 when the unemployment rate was 7.9 percent.
The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since December 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
March 2020 to

March 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County8.2%+6.0%
Broward County5.3%-0.6%
Palm Beach County4.7%-0.7%
Florida5.3%+0.3%
United States6.2%+1.7%

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

 

In March 2021, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 8.1 percent, which is 6.2 percentage points higher than in March 2020. The unemployment rate is 0.3 percentage points lower than in February 2021 when it was at 8.3 percent. The seasonally adjusted unemployment data allows for better analysis over longer periods of time and reflect the long-term trends more clearly.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.
The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.
Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey.

February 2021 Employment Report

The numbers analyzed

 In February 2021, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 7.9 percent. From January 2021 to February 2021, there was an increase of 6,500 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 0.6 percentage point increase. The County had a reduction of 110,400 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from February 2020 to February 2021 which was an 8.9 percentage point decrease.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (January 2020 with January 2021). This is in particularly true when comparing the three months leading up to the COVID-19 crisis to the first two months of 2021. Year over year, every sector saw a decrease in the number of non-agricultural payroll jobs. The graph below shows the payroll data since November 2018.

From February 2020 to February 2021 there was a reduction of 110,400 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From January 2021 to February 2021 there was an increase of 6,500 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

 

 

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between January 2021 and February 2021 shows that several sectors added jobs during that time period.

 

SectorFebruary 2020- February 2021January 2021 – February 2021
Financial Activities-2,000 (-2.4%)+300 (+0.4%)
Manufacturing -2,300 (-5.4%)+800 (+2.0%)
Information-2,300 (-10.3%)+200 (-1.1%)
Construction-2,700 (-4.9%)+100 (+0.2%)
Professional & Business Services-5,200 (-2.8%)+3,600 (+2.0%)
Wholesale Trade-5,300 (-7.2%)-600 (-0.9%)
Other Services-5,600 (-11.1%)+500 (+1.1%)
Total Government-9,100 (-6.2%)1,200 (+0.9%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-9,700 (-11.1%)0.0 (-0.0%)
Retail Trade-10,700 (-7.5%)-1,200 (-0.9%)
Education & Health Services-11,500 (-5.8%)+400 (+0.2%)
Leisure and Hospitality-44,000 (-29.4%)+1,200 (+1.1%)

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

 

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.9 percent in February 2021 compared to last year is 6.3 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 1.6 percent in February 2020. Compared to January 2021 there was a 0.2 percentage point decrease from the unemployment rate at 8.1 percent.

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since December 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

February 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
February 2020 to

February 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County7.9%+6.3%
Broward County5.6%+2.3%
Palm Beach County4.5%+1.2%
Florida5.0%+1.9%
United States6.6%+2.8%

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

 

In February 2021, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 8.3 percent, which is 6.3 percentage points higher than in February 2020. The unemployment rate is 0.1 percentage points lower than in January 2021 when it was at 8.4 percent.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

Diana Londoño is Awarded with 40 Under 40 Award in Economic Development by DCI

Miami, FL– March 17, 2021 – Diana Londono, Vice President of International Economic Development for the Miami-Dade Beacon Council has been announced as a recipient of the 2021 Economic Development 40 Under 40 Award, the biennial award recognizing rising stars under 40 years old in the economic development industry.

The awards program is hosted by Development Counsellors International (DCI), a New York-based integrated marketing firm that works with economic development and travel organizations around the globe, and Jorgenson Consulting, a leading national executive search firm serving organizations in non-profit, economic, and community development industries. An independent selection committee of six economic development professionals and site selection consultants evaluated a record-number of 200-plus nominees.

“This past year has demonstrated the importance of economic development in building and sustaining resilient communities,” said Julie Curtin, president of DCI’s economic development practice. “I’m especially impressed by the diverse perspectives and skillsets of this year’s winners as they lead communities to prioritize new ways of thinking, building inclusive and equitable economies, and bringing an attitude of fresh new ideas to the challenges in the industry. The economic development future is bright with these young leaders.”

“I am honored to be recognized as one of the 2021 Economic Development 40 under 40 rising star,” said Diana Londono, Vice President of International Economic Development for the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “This recognition embodies my commitment to equitable creation of wealth for individuals, communities, and businesses.”

“Since joining the organization in 2018, Diana has become an integral part of our business development team, using her experience and enthusiasm to bring a unique point of view to our organization and to Miami’s economic development as a whole,” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO, Miami-Dade Beacon Council, the County’s official economic development organization. “Not only was she selected as a rising star from a pool of 200 potential candidates but has proven results while serving at Enterprise Florida and The Miami-Dade Beacon Council.”

Diana Londono joined the Miami-Dade Beacon Council from Enterprise Florida Inc. (EFI), there she managed the Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) portfolio for The State of Florida. Londono also led the international business development and recruitment efforts for the state with support from ten international offices serving many markets. Diana first joined EFI as Stakeholder Engagement Manager where she supported the economic development partners from all regions and counties in the state, enhancing partnerships on the local and state level. In her current role at the Miami-Dade Beacon Council, Diana supports the expansion of international business development and recruitment efforts for the County. Additionally, as part of her role she also leads the Creative Design Committee, a cross-industry platform that brings together Miami-Dade County’s creative design employers to address issues and growth opportunities together.

“The economic development industry is in good hands with these rising leaders,” said Todd Jorgenson, managing director and principal of Jorgenson Consulting, Inc. “The communities they represent—from Tuxpan, Mexico to Covington, Kentucky to Québec, Canada—are fortunate to have the smart, innovative ideas of this year’s winners.”

DCI and Jorgenson officially announced the winners last night at a virtual awards reception held in conjunction with the International Economic Development Council Leadership Summit.

 

For more information on the 40 Under 40 awards program and this year’s winners, visit econdev40under40.com.

 

Media Contacts:     

Maria Teresa Garcia

Communications Manager, Miami- Dade Beacon Council

305.335.8894

tgarcia@beacouncouncil.com

 

Julie Curtin

President, Economic Development, DCI

303.627.0272

julie.curtin@aboutdci.com

 

Download Diana Londoño’s headshot here.

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About the MiamiDade Beacon Council
The Miami‐Dade Beacon Council is the official economic development organization for Miami‐Dade County. Its mission is to increase jobs and investment through marketing Miami as a world-class business destination, helping grow local companies, and shaping Miami-Dade’s economic future. Since 1985, the organization has assisted more than 1,200 businesses to expand in or relocate to Miami-Dade, creating more than 104,000 direct and indirect jobs combined, and driving more than $6.7 billion in new capital investments. A professional staff and volunteer community leaders work together to promote Miami-Dade as a world‐class business community at the forefront of a changing global economy, driving long-term growth and prosperity for the region. For more information, visit: www.beaconcouncil.com.

 

About DCI

Considered the leader in marketing places, Development Counsellors International (DCI) specializes in economic development and tourism marketing. The agency has designed integrated marketing campaigns for more than 500 cities, regions, states and countries since it was established in New York City in 1960. Services include public relations, branding, research, websites, paid media, and talent attraction. www.aboutdci.com

 

About Jorgenson Consulting

Founded in 1992, Jorgenson Consulting has worked diligently over the past 29 years to establish itself as a premier national executive search firm. With a focus on the fields of non-profit, economic and community development, we partner with our clients to help them identify and secure the highest caliber of executive talent. Our goal is to develop a thorough understanding of our clients and leverage that knowledge with our own expertise and resources to source executive talent that can truly serve the organization by yielding economic benefits while also contributing to a community’s competitive advantage. www.jci-inc.net

 

January 2021 Employment Report

The numbers analyzed

In January 2021, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 8.1 percent. The County had a reduction of 107,600 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from January 2020 to January 2021 which was an 8.8 percentage point decrease. From December 2020 to January 2021, there was a decrease of 16,300 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 1.4 percentage point decrease.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (January 2020 with January 2021). This is in particularly true when comparing the three months leading up to the COVID-19 crisis to January 2021. Miami-Dade County saw one of the largest. Year over year, every sector saw a decrease in the number of non-agricultural payroll jobs. The graph below shows the payroll data since November 2018.

 

From January 2020 to January 2021 there was a reduction of 107,600 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From December 2020 to January 2021 there was an decrease of 16,300 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

 

 

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between December 2020 and January 2021 shows that only two sectors have added jobs. These sectors include Construction (+500) and Wholesale Trade (+600).

 

SectorJanuary 2020- January 2021December 2020 – January 2021
Manufacturing -1,600 (-3.8%)-1,600 (-3.8%)
Construction-1,800 (-3.4%) +500 (+1.0%)
Information-2,100 (-10.3%)-200 (-1.1%)
Financial Activities-2,200 (-2.7%)-2.200 (-2.7%)
Wholesale Trade-4,500 (-6.1%)+600 (+0.9%)
Other Services-6,000 (-11.9%)-200 (-0.4%)
Professional & Business Services-6,300 (-3.4%)-3,900 (-2.2%)
Total Government-9,300 (-6.3%)-100 (-0.1%)
Education & Health Services-9,400 (-4.8%)-2,300 (-1.2%)
Retail Trade-10,700 (-7.4%)-3,400 (-2.5%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-11,200 (-12.6%)-3,200 (-4.0%)
Leisure and Hospitality-42,500 (-28.9%)-300 (-0.3%)

 

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 8.1 percent in January 2021 compared to last year is 6.3 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 1.8 percent in January 2020. Compared to December 2020 there was a 0.2 percentage point increase from the unemployment rate at 7.9 percent.

 

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since December 2018.

 

 

 

 

January 2021
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
January 2020 to

January 2021
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County8.1%+6.3%
Broward County5.3%+1.9%
Palm Beach County4.8%+2.2%
Florida5.3%+1.9%
United States6.8%+2.8%

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

In January 2021, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 8.4 percent, which is 6.4 percentage points higher than in January 2020. The unemployment rate is 0.2 percentage points lower than in December 2020 when it was at 8.6 percent.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.

SoftBank Joins Ambitious Initiative to Build a More Equitable Pipeline for Data Science Talent

 

SoftBank partners with Correlation One’s pioneering effort to upskill up to 10,000 workers from underrepresented communities across the U.S. and Latin America

 

Miami, Florida – FEBRUARY 18, 2021 – SoftBank Group International (SoftBank) as part of its AI Academy, today announced its support for Data Science for All / Empowerment (DS4A / Empowerment), a new effort designed to upskill and prepare job seekers from underserved communities for data science careers. Developed by Correlation One, DS4A / Empowerment aims to train at least 10,000 people from underrepresented communities over the next three years, providing new pathways to economic opportunity in the world’s fastest-growing industries.

“We need talent with a deep understanding of data science to build the companies of the future,” said Marcelo Claure, CEO of SoftBank Group International. “We’re proud to support this effort, continue to upskill our portfolio companies and train more than 10,000 people from underrepresented communities with critical technical skills.”

SoftBank’s AI Academy supports programs that supplement theoretical training of traditional technical education courses with practical lessons, including AI and data skills that can be immediately applied to common business needs.

DS4A / Empowerment will provide training for SoftBank Group International portfolio company employees, including portfolio companies of the Opportunity Fund and Latin America Fund, as well as external candidates from the U.S. and Latin America. The program is specifically designed to address talent and equity gaps in a field that has historically been inaccessible for many workers, leading to significant underrepresentation of women and non-white individuals. Participants work on real-world case studies that are expected to have measurable impact on the operational performance of participating companies.

IDB Lab will join SoftBank by providing over ten full-ride Fellowships to underrepresented candidates in Latin America while the Miami-Dade Beacon Council will provide four full-ride fellowships for underrepresented candidates based in Miami.

In addition, The City of Miami will join as an impact partner by providing twenty fellowships to Miami talent and five fellowships to public sector workers.

“As Miami grows as a tech hub, it is important that we empower local entrepreneurs and the public sector to leverage the power of AI. We are proud to support the building of a diverse data-fluent community in Miami through our partnership with Correlation One and SoftBank,” said Francis Suarez, Mayor of the City of Miami.

Participants in the program will receive 13 weeks of data and analytics training (plus optional Python training) while working on case studies and projects, including projects submitted by SoftBank portfolio companies. The initiative will also connect participants with mentors who will provide professional development and career coaching. At the end of the program, external participants will be connected with employment opportunities at SoftBank and leading enterprises across business, financial services, technology, healthcare, consulting, and consumer sectors.

“Miami’s success hinges on dramatically expanding opportunity across our community and building a workforce with the skills for the jobs of tomorrow,” said Matt Haggman, Executive Vice President of One Community One Goal at the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. “This program is an important step towards creating the innovative and equitable future we can – and must – achieve.”

“Training our residents to take on the jobs of the future is critical to ensuring that economic growth is shared across all communities, and to building our local talent so that more leading companies in fields like tech and data science can put down roots in Miami-Dade,” said Daniella Levine-Cava, Miami-Dade County’s Mayor. “I’m thrilled that this program is unlocking opportunities in a field that has historically been inaccessible for so many, and creating new, inclusive pathways to prosperity in one of the world’s fastest-growing industries.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic has both accelerated demand for data science talent and exacerbated the access gaps that kept so many aspiring workers locked out of opportunity,” said Rasheed Sabar and Sham Mustafa, Co-CEOs and Co-Founders of Correlation One. “We are grateful to work with innovative employers like SoftBank that are stepping up to play a more direct role in helping the workforce prepare themselves for jobs of the future.”

 

Program and Registration Details

DS4A Empowerment is an online program delivered in English over a 13-week period. Classes will convene on Saturdays from 10:00am to 8:00pm ET, beginning on April 17, 2021.

Registration for the program ends on March 7, 2021. Candidates who should consider applying include employees of SoftBank affiliated portfolio companies in the region as well as software engineers, technical product managers, technical marketers, and anyone with a STEM background who is interested in learning data analysis. To apply and find out more information about the program, interested candidates can visit the official DS4A Empowerment website: https://c1-web.correlation-one.com/ds4a-empowerment

For program related inquiries, please contact ds4aempowerment@correlation-one.com.

 

About SoftBank

The SoftBank Group invests in breakthrough technology to improve the quality of life for people around the world. The SoftBank Group is comprised of SoftBank Group Corp. (TOKYO: 9984), an investment holding company that includes telecommunications, internet services, AI, smart robotics, IoT and clean energy technology providers; the SoftBank Vision Funds, which are investing up to $100 billion to help extraordinary entrepreneurs transform industries and shape new ones; and the SoftBank Latin America Fund, the largest venture fund in the region. To learn more, please visit https://global.softbank

About Correlation One

Correlation One is on a mission to build the most equitable vocational school of the future. We believe that data literacy is the most important skill for the future of work. We make data fluency a competitive edge for firms through global data science competitions, rigorous data skills assessments, and enterprise-focused data science training.

Correlation One’s solutions are used by some of the most elite employers all around the world in finance, technology, healthcare, insurance, consulting and governmental agencies. Since launching in 2015, Correlation One has built an expert community of 250,000+ data scientists and 600+ partnerships with leading universities and data science organizations in the US, UK, Canada, China, and Latin America.

https://www.correlation-one.com/about

 

 

Media Contacts

For SoftBank:

Laura Gaviria Halaby

Laura.gaviria@softbank.com

 

For City of Miami:

Stephanie Severino

sseverino@miamigov.com

 

For Miami-Dade Beacon Council:

Maria Budet
mbudet@beaconcouncil.com

 

For Miami-Dade County Mayor’s Office:

Rachel Johnson

rachel.johnson2@miamidade.gov

From November 2020 to December 2020, there was an increase of 4,600 nonagricultural payroll jobs; a 0.4 percentage point increase

Sponsored by:

The numbers analyzed

In December 2020, the not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 7.3 percent. The County had a reduction of 69,200 nonagricultural payroll jobs (not seasonally adjusted), from December 2019 to December 2020 which was a 5.6 percentage point decrease. From November 2020 to December 2020, there was an increase of 4,600 nonagricultural payroll jobs, which is a 0.4 percentage point increase.

 

Non-agricultural Payroll Jobs

Due to the impact of COVID-19, there continues to be a sharp decline in non-agricultural payroll jobs throughout most industries when comparing year over year (December 2019 with December 2020). The sectors most affected are Leisure & Hospitality (-24,100), Total Government (-15,200), Education & Health Services (-10,600), Retail Trade (-6,200), Other Services (-4,100), Professional & Business Services (-3,900), Wholesale Trade (-3,600), and Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities (-3,500). The sectors seeing some improvements in the past 12 months are Financial Activities (+1,500), Construction (+1,100), and Manufacturing (+300). The graph below shows the payroll data since November 2018.

 

From December 2019 to December 2020 there was a reduction of 69,200 non-agricultural payroll jobs. From November 2020 to December 2020 there was an increase of 4,600 non-agricultural payroll jobs.

 

The change in non-agricultural payroll job between November 2020 and December 2020 shows that several sectors have added jobs, including in sectors that were the hardest hit during the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. These sectors include Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities (+2,300), Retail Trade (+1,600), Leisure and Hospitality (+1,400), and Wholesale Trade (+400).

 

SectorDecember 2019- December 2020November 2020 – December 2020
Financial Activities+1,500 (+1.8%)+1,300 (+1.6%)
Construction+1,100 (+2.1%)-900 (-1.6%)
Manufacturing +300 (+0.7%)-1,600 (-3.6%)
Information-900 (-4.3%)00 (0.0%)
Transportation, Warehousing, & Utilities-3,500 (-4.0%)+2,300 (+2.8%)
Wholesale Trade-3,600 (-4.9%)+400 (+0.6%)
Professional & Business Services-3,900 (-2.1%)+2,700 (+1.5%)
Other Services-4,100 (-8.1%)+400 (+0.9%)
Retail Trade-6,200 (-4.1%)+1,600 (+1.1%)
Education & Health Services-10,600 (-5.4%)-800 (-0.4%)
Total Government-15,200 (-10.4%)-2,200 (-1.6%)
Leisure and Hospitality-24,100 (-16.3%)+1,400 (+1.1%)

 

 

Not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.3 percent in December 2020 compared to last year is 5.7 percentage points higher than the unemployment rate at 1.6 percent in December 2019. Compared to November 2020 there was a 0.6 percentage point decrease from the unemployment rate at 7.9 percent.

Additionally, analyzing Miami’s unemployment history in the graph below, the Miami metro area labor force statistics use a different measurement method than all other counties in Florida. The information for the monthly employment and unemployment estimates come from Current Population Survey (CPS). There are only seven large areas across the nation which uses this labor force statistics model. The increase in the count of unemployed individuals in Miami-Dade County in September 2020 and the subsequent decrease in October was driven by the responses of Miami residents to the Current Population Survey. The graph compares the unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County with that of the United States since December 2018.

 

 

 

 

December 2020
Unemployment Rate
(Not Seasonally Adjusted)
December 2019 to

December 2020
Unemployment Rate Change (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Miami-Dade County7.3%+5.7%
Broward County6.6%+4.0%
Palm Beach County5.5%+2.8%
Florida5.8%+3.3%
United States6.5%+3.1%

 

 

Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate 

In December 2020, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for Miami-Dade County (taking seasonal fluctuations in the labor force into consideration) was 7.5 percent, which is 5.5 percentage points higher than in December 2019. The unemployment rate is 0.6 percentage points lower than in November 2020 when it was at 8.1 percent.

 

 

From the data and analysis above, we continued to observe the negative impact of COVID-19 on our local economy. Nevertheless, the community needs to remain focused on job-retention projects in targeted industries, as well as all sectors. These industries have been identified as the Miami-Dade County industries most able to create additional well-paying job opportunities, leading to an improved quality of life for Miami-Dade County residents. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council continues to aggressively work on attracting new companies to our community and work on the expansion and retention of existing business. For more information, visit www.beaconcouncil.com.

The job creation numbers are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics Program (CES), and only account for non-farm payroll jobs. However, the unemployment rates are derived from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS), which includes farm payroll jobs as well as self-employed workers.

In addition, the federal government typically conducts interviews in sample households to determine the unemployment rate. Miami-Dade County is one of six metropolitan areas in the United States that uses a different method solely based on a statistical model derived from several data sets.